Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. Our show is special because we make it our priority to go where the silence is. We put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. If everyone who visited our website in the next week donated just $15, we would cover all of our operating costs for the year. We can't do it without you. Please donate today. It takes just a couple of minutes to do your part to make sure Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else.

Your Donation: $

Friday, April 30, 1999

download:   Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • Publisher of the Ecologist Speaks About Biotechnology and Global Warming

    As NATO warplanes bomb Yugoslavia for the 38th day, the Serbian Environment Minister said yesterday that large quantities of chlorine and other noxious gases have been released into the air because of the bombing of a refinery and a petrochemical plant just a few miles from Belgrade. NATO has also bombed fertilizer and chemical plants, which are spewing toxic fumes into the atmosphere.

  • South Africa’s Journey to Healing and Reconciliation

    South African police this week attacked one of the country’s star soccer players during a traffic stop, beating him and shooting him in the shoulder as he rode in his car with his sister. Lifa Gqosha, midfielder for the Kaizer Cheifs, the nation’s most popular soccer team, was assaulted after the police pulled him over and questioned whether he owned the car he was driving. Gqosha is black, and the officers were white.