Dear Democracy Now! Visitor: We are an independent, ad-free daily news program that serves millions of viewers and listeners each month. Our show is special because we make it our priority to go where the silence is. We put a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lift up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. We do all of this with just a fraction of the budget and staff of a commercial news show. We do it without ads, corporate sponsorship or government funding. How is this possible? Only with your support. If everyone who visited our website in the next week donated just $15, we would cover all of our operating costs for the year. We can't do it without you. Please donate today. It takes just a couple of minutes to do your part to make sure Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else.

Your Donation: $

Thursday, June 17, 1999

download:   Get CD/DVD More Formats
  • War and Peace Report From Kosovo

    U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said today that NATO will not give in to demands from Russia for its own zone in the Kosovo peacekeeping mission, which Russian President Boris Yeltsin reiterated today. Russia also said today that NATO forces are being too "complacent" about the demilitarization of the Kosovo Liberation Army and asked the Security Council to discuss the issue.

  • International Labor Convention and Child Soldiers

    The International Labor Organization (ILO) adopted a treaty today banning the worst forms of child labor, including slavery and trafficking. The pact was approved by the ILO’s 174 member states, as well as workers’ and employers’ representatives at the UN agency’s annual meeting.

  • Y2K Computer Bug

    The Senate approved legislation Tuesday that would limit lawsuits against companies arising from Year 2,000 computer problems. The bill would place a ceiling on punitive damages against corporations, and give companies 90 days to solve their Y2K problems before they could be held liable. The Office of Management and Budget also raised to over $8 billion its estimate of how much the federal government expects to spend fixing the Y2K problem.