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Thursday, September 2, 1999

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  • East Timor

    UN officials in East Timor pleaded with the Indonesian military today to protect them, one day after militias armed and backed by Indonesia besieged the UN compound in Dili, killing at least two people. The Indonesian military and police have so far stood by and let the militias wage a campaign of terror against the East Timorese population, particularly targeting those who support self-determination for East Timor. [includes rush transcript]

  • Bush Dodges Questions On Drug Use, Prison Population in Texas Continues to Grow

    The 100th person to be executed in Texas since George W. Bush became governor died last night at 6pm in the Walls Unit of Huntsville. Raymond Jones said he had no last words before he was injected with a lethal combination of drugs. Bush, who has capitalized politically on his "tough on crime" stance, has broken all records for executions under a governor in the history of the United States.

  • Police Killings in Jamaica

    The high level of police killings in the island nation of Jamaica is attracting the attention of international human rights groups. According to the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, local police have averaged between 130 and 140 killings per year over the past five years, with 145 killings in 1998. In a U.S. State Department report, the Jamaican police is cited as the major perpetrator of unauthorized or extra-judicial killings in the Caribbean and Latin America. Last month, police killed seven people in a 24-hour period. This, in a country plagued with economic stagnation, poverty and a severe crime rate. Jamaica, it should also be noted, surpasses all other nations in the region except for Colombia in the number of civilian murders.