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Friday, April 28, 2000

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  • Shareholders Revolution

    As the corporate media and public radio and television bring us hourly reports on how the Dow is rallying, we look at the rallies outside the annual shareholders meetings at some of the country’s most powerful corporations. This Wednesday there were protests outside of Chevron’s annual shareholders meeting in San Ramon, California. Yesterday, pharmaceutical giant Pfeizer held its meeting in New York, and today it’s Occidental Petroleum in Los Angeles. [includes rush transcript]

  • Tensions in Vieques Increase, As Deadline Passes for Protesters to Clear Naval Base

    In Vieques, Puerto Rico, protesters have held their ground now for over a year, as they seek to end 50 years of military exercises and bombings on the island by the U.S. Navy. The protesters have established encampments inside the military camps where the firing ranges are located, and have paralyzed live ammunition exercises for over a year. [includes rush transcript]

  • Jonathan Kozol: The Forgotten Children of the U.S.

    This week, the Justice Department and six major foundations released a report that concluded at every step of the juvenile justice system, Black and Latino youths are treated more severely than white teenagers charged with comparable crimes. The report, called "And Justice for Some," found that youth of color are more likely than their counterparts to be arrested, held in jail, sent to juvenile or adult court for trial, and convicted and given longer prison terms. And blacks are more than six times as likely as whites to be sentenced by juvenile courts to prison. [includes rush transcript]

  • Race and Revolution: Cuba and Blackness

    Today we head to Cuba once again for part two of "Race and Revolution," a collection of interviews conducted in Cuba by Democracy Now! producer Maria Carrión. [includes rush transcript]

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