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Friday, August 24, 2001

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  • U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (US PTO) gives the Texas based company RiceTec patents on basmati rice

    RiceTec took U.S. Long grain rice and crossbred it with Indian basmati rice to produce the three newly patented hybrid strains of basmati rice: texmati, jasmati, and kasmati. RiceTec has also been given permission to claim that their rice is superior to basmati, though basmati has been grown for centuries in the foothills of the Himalayas.

  • 100,000 anti-globalization protestors to jam the nation’s capitol

    Activists file a suit in Federal court to protest a nine-foot wall around next month’s meeting of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Washington, D.C.; they claim that their rights to Freedom of Speech, Assembly and Petition are being unfairly blocked. They say the police and mainstream media have ridiculed their cause as incoherent because the protestors are raising so many different issues.

  • 450,000 Brazilian Federal employees on strike

    Concern is growing about the Brazil accord with the IMF. We discuss the affect of Brazilian debt to IMF structural adjustment and massive budget cuts to education and other Federal programs. We speak to Marilia Washington, Vice-President of the Sao Paolo chapter of the Association of Higher Education Teachers at recently retired professor of Education, Sao Carlos Federal University, Brazil.

  • Book author jailed for refusing to hand over her research on Angleton murder case

    Vanessa Leggett, an aspiring book author has been jailed since July 20th, when she was found in contempt of court, when she refused to hand over notes and tapes to grand jury federal prosecutors investigating the murder of a high profile murder case, of 40 year old Doris Angleton, wife of millionaire former bookie, Robert Angleton. The International Federation of Journalists, the American Society of Newspaper Editors, the Committee to Protect Journalists, and the Society of Professional Journalists have all condemned her jailing. They argue that the use of similar subpoenas could allow prosecutors to use journalists as private investigators restricting the free flow of information to the public. We are joined by Maryilyn Smeets from the America’s program at the Committee to Protect Journalists and Ray Marcano, President of the Society of Professional Journalists. We discuss whether non-journalists and private citizens may exercise their First Amendment Rights to gather information for the purposes of public dissemination.