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Tuesday, March 19, 2002

  • Human Rights Lawyer and Activist Jennifer Harbury Brings the Case of Her Murdered Husband Tothe Supreme Court

    Human rights lawyer Jennifer Harbury stood before the Supreme Court Monday to argue her right to sue the governmentfor covering up the murder of her husband, a slain Guatemalan rebel leader, Efrain Bamaca Velazquez. Harbury filedseveral lawsuits against U.S. government agencies and individual officials, charging that they repeatedly lied to herabout what they knew of her husband’s death. Among the officials cited in the case are former Secretary of StateWarren Christopher, former national security adviser Anthony Lake, and five other White House and State Departmentofficials. While a federal judge dismissed her initial case, an appeals court reinstated parts of the suit, leadingthe State Department to seek review by the Supreme Court. That review was heard yesterday.

  • On the Eve of the Anniversary of the Assassination of Archbishop Oscar Romero, Gunned Down By Graduates of the Former U.S. Army School of the Americas, a Debate On the School of the Americas

    This Sunday is the 22-year anniversary of the assassination of Archbishop Oscar Romero, gunned down while celebratingMass at the Divine Providence Cancer Hospital in San Salvador. Oscar Romero was killed by graduates of the US ArmySchool of the Americas, members of death squads allied with US-trained Salvadorian security forces. In early 1990, aUS Congressional Taskforce was formed to investigate the massacre of six Jesuit priests and two others in ElSalvador. The taskforce reported that those responsible were trained at the SOA. Soon after, a group called the SOAWatch formed to piece together a history of the military school they began to call the School of the Assassins.

  • As Vice President Dick Cheney Tours Arab Nations to Drum Up Support for a U.S. Attack Oniraq, the Founder of Peace Studies Talks About the Lessons of War

    We are going to turn now to the final segment of a talk Johan Galtung gave this weekend at Pace University. Galtungsays the US assault on so-called "terrorism" in the six months since September 11th is simply state terrorism.Galtung, who has helped mediate in over 50 international conflicts, has been working on conflict transformation withAfghan leaders in the region.

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