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Tuesday, July 19, 2005

  • Seymour Hersh: Bush Authorized Covert Plan to Manipulate Iraqi Elections


    Pulitzer prize-winning investigative journalist Seymour Hersh reports that President Bush authorized covert plans last year to support the election campaigns of Iraqi candidates and political parties with close ties to the White House. Hersh cites unidentified former military and intelligence officials who said the administration went ahead with the plan over congressional opposition. [includes rush transcript]

  • The NOC Program: A Look at Valerie Plame’s "Nonofficial Cover" as a CIA Operative


    As pressure mounts for President Bush to fire senior adviser Karl Rove for his role in the outing of undercover CIA operative Valerie Plame, we take a look at her reported work as a "NOC"–"nonofficial cover". We speak with investigative journalist Bob Dreyfuss, the first American reporter to cover the CIA’s Non-Official Cover program. [includes rush transcript]

  • Survivors of 1979 Greensboro Massacre Testify Before Truth and Reconciliation Commission


    We look back at the 1979 Greensboro Massacre, when forty Ku Klux Klansmen and American Nazis opened fire on an anti-Klan demonstration in Greensboro, North Carolina. Five people were killed. No one was convicted. We speak with Paul Bermanzohn, a survivor of the massacre who testified before a Truth and Reconciliation Commission almost 26 years after the massacre. [includes rush transcript]