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Wednesday, July 25, 2007

  • On 109th Anniversary of U.S. Invasion of Puerto Rico, Acclaimed Photojournalist Frank Espada and Poet Martin Espada Reflect on Ongoing Struggle for National Rights

    Espadamartin

    On the 109th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Puerto Rico, debate continues over Puerto Rico’s political independence and U.S. military and corporate presence on the island. Puerto Ricans have had U.S. citizenship since 1917, but residents of the island cannot vote for president and lack voting representation in the U.S. Congress. We speak with two prominent Puerto Rican voices. Photojournalist and activist Frank Espada has worked for decades documenting the Puerto Rican diaspora, as well as the civil rights movement in the United States. Martín Espada is Frank’s son and an acclaimed poet and professor at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. [includes rush transcript]

  • Professor Ward Churchill Vows to Sue University of Colorado over Controversial Firing

    Churchillw

    The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado in Boulder voted 8 to 1 Tuesday evening to fire tenured professor of ethnic studies Ward Churchill on charges of research misconduct. But Churchill maintains that the allegations were a pretext to remove him for his controversial political views. One day after his firing, Churchill calls the charges a sham and vows a suit against the school. [includes rush transcript]