Thursday, November 18, 2010

  • Haitians Barricading Streets with Coffins as Protests against U.N. Continue over Cholera Outbreak

    Coffin

    Protests are continuing in Haiti over the cholera outbreak that has now killed more than 1,100 people and infected some 17,000. On Wednesday, residents in the city of Cap-Haïtien clashed with U.N. troops for the third consecutive day. Crowds have taken to the streets expressing anger at the Haitian government and the United Nations for failing to contain the disease. We go to Cap-Haïtien to speak with independent journalist Ansel Herz. [includes rush transcript]

  • As New York Debates Secure Communities Program, Study Challenges Controversial Policy to Deport Immigrant Prisoners

    Secure-comm

    A battle is brewing in New York over the Secure Communities Program, a controversial federal immigration enforcement policy that requires local police to forward fingerprints of every person they arrest to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. New York Gov. David Paterson has approved a Secure Communities agreement, but is facing heavy opposition. We speak to Aarti Shahani, author of a new study that challenges this policy. She found that for immigrant prisoners arrested on drug charges and detained at Rikers Island prison in New York City, suspects charged with lower-level crimes were selected for deportation more often than those charged with serious felonies. In other words, while Homeland Security claims to be targeting dangerous criminals for deportation, the study found no correlation between the level of offense committed and being targeted for deportation. [includes rush transcript]

  • Student, Prisoner Advocate Tam Phan Faces Deportation Order to Vietnam

    Pt

    Tam Phan came to the United States from Vietnam when he was six years old. He later became involved with a gang and spent 17 years in prison. He turned his life around and is now pursuing a master’s degree in urban policy and administration at Brooklyn College and is working at the Fortune Society, a nonprofit organization that helps ex-convicts reenter society. But Tam Phan has been given a final deportation order, and his only recourse is a pardon from New York Gov. David Paterson. [includes rush transcript]

  • Punk Rock Legend Patti Smith Wins National Book Award for Memoir Just Kids

    Patti

    The singer-songwriter, poet, artist and punk rock legend Patti Smith has won the National Book Award in the non-fiction category for memoir, Just Kids. The book tells the story of Smith’s coming of age in New York City and her lifelong friendship and creative collaboration with the renowned photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. We interviewed Patti Smith earlier this year. [includes rush transcript]

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