Wednesday, November 3, 2010

  • GOP Win Back House, Dems Keep Senate in 2010 Midterm Elections


    Republicans took control of the House and made gains in the Senate in Tuesday’s midterm elections, just four years after Democrats swept control of Congress. With 13 races yet to be called, Republicans gained 59 seats in the House, the party’s largest win in congressional elections in more than a century. Analysts expect Democrats to maintain control of the Senate, but two key races have not yet been called: Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet vs. Republican Ken Buck in Colorado and Democratic Sen. Patty Murray vs. Republican Dino Rossi in Washington State. [includes rush transcript]

  • EXCLUSIVE: Filmmaker Michael Moore on Midterm Elections, the Tea Party, and the Future of the Democratic Party


    For the past 20 years, renowned filmmaker, author and activist Michael Moore has been one of the most politically active, provocative and successful documentary filmmakers in the business. Moore came to our studio last night for our special live Election Night broadcast to discuss the midterm election results, the Tea Party movement, and the future of the Democratic and Republican parties. [includes rush transcript]

  • Election Roundtable: Breaking Down the Results with Laura Flanders of GritTV, The Nation’s Richard Kim & John Nichols, and Journalist David Goodman


    The midterm elections saw two key Senate victories for the Tea Party and major losses for the right-leaning Blue Dog Democrats. Meanwhile, the Senate lost one of its most progressive lawmakers with the ouster of Democrat Russ Feingold of Wisconsin. We get analysis from four guests: Laura Flanders, host of GritTV; Richard Kim, senior editor at The Nation magazine; John Nichols of The Nation magazine; and Vermont-based journalist and author David Goodman. [includes rush transcript]

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Full News Hour


    Juan González on How Puerto Rico’s Economic "Death Spiral" is Tied to Legacy of Colonialism
    Could Puerto Rico become America’s Greece? That’s a question many are asking as the island faces a devastating financial crisis and a rapidly crumbling healthcare system. Puerto Rico owes $72 billion in debt. $355 million in debt payments are due December 1, but it increasingly looks like the U.S. territory may default on at least some of the debt. Congress has so far failed to act on an Obama administration proposal that includes extending bankruptcy protection to Puerto Rico and allocating more equitable Medicaid and Medicare...


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