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Friday, April 9, 2010

  • Once-Banned Muslim Scholar Tariq Ramadan on His First Visit to US in Six Years, President Obama and Why Muslims Should Make Their Voices Heard

    Ramadan

    We speak with leading Muslim scholar Tariq Ramadan, who was banned from entering the United States for six years. In 2004, Ramadan had accepted a job to become a tenured professor at the University of Notre Dame, but nine days before he was set to arrive, the Bush administration revoked his visa, invoking a provision of the PATRIOT Act. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton lifted the travel ban earlier this year. This week, he arrived in New York for the first time since 2004. Tariq Ramadan joins us in our studio to talk about the ban, his thoughts on President Obama, the importance for Muslims to make their voices heard, and much more. [includes rush transcript]

  • World Bank Approves Multi-Billion-Dollar Loan for Coal-Fired Power Plant in South Africa

    South_africa_coal

    Even as the worst coal mine disaster in the United States in a quarter of a century unfolds in West Virginia, the World Bank has approved a controversial $3.75 billion loan for South Africa to build one of the world’s largest coal-fired power plants. Environmentalists in South Africa and abroad have criticized the decision and are urging the bank to stop supporting the development of coal plants and other large emitters of greenhouse gas emissions. We speak with one of the chief critics of the project, South African environmentalist Desmond D’Sa. [includes rush transcript]