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Wednesday, January 12, 2011

  • Tè Tremblé: Remembering the Earthquake in Haiti

    1anniversary

    One year ago today, Haiti was devastated by a massive earthquake. Up to a quarter of a million people were killed and more than 1.5 million were made homeless. It was one of the worst natural disasters in history. We go back to January 12, 2010, and to the aftermath of the earthquake — what Haitians call Tè Tremblé, the earth trembles. [includes rush transcript]

  • Wesleyan Professor Alex Dupuy: Haiti Transformed into the "Republic of the NGOs"

    Clinton

    One year after the massive 7.0-magnitude earthquake that devastated Haiti, reconstruction efforts have barely begun. We speak with Alex Dupuy, a professor of sociology at Wesleyan University. "There is a dramatic power imbalance between the international community — under U.S. leadership — and Haiti. The former monopolizes economic and political power and calls all the shots," Dupuy writes. "This unequal relationship is reflected in the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission." The IHRC is co-chaired by Bill Clinton. [includes rush transcript]

  • Haitian Activist Patrick Elie: "Haiti is Controlled by Foreign Governments and Foreign Interests"

    Elie

    On the first anniversary of the earthquake in Haiti, we go to Port-au-Prince to speak with Patrick Elie, a longtime Haitian democracy activist and Haiti’s former Secretary of State for Public Security. "I don’t think, truly, that the Haitian people have to be pitied or mourned. They have to get true solidarity in their endeavor to rebuild," Elie says. "We must resist the impulse to rebuild Port-au-Prince the way it was: a city of exclusion, of hyper-concentration and of shanty towns, which contributed very, very much to the high toll that we’ve paid after the earthquake." [includes rush transcript]

  • Haitian Writer Jean Saint-Vil: One Year After Earthquake, Haitian Population Treated as a Threat, Not an Asset

    Child

    On the anniversary of the earthquake in Haiti, we speak with Ottawa-based Haitian writer and activist, Jean Saint-Vil. "One year after the earthquake, we are seeing the Haitian population being treated and seen as a threat, rather than as an asset," Saint-Vil says. "That’s the major paradigm shift that must occur if we have to get out of this mess." [includes rush transcript]

  • Novelist Edwidge Danticat: "Haitians Are Very Resilient, But It Doesn’t Mean They Can Suffer More Than Other People"

    Danticat

    On the anniversary of the earthquake in Haiti, we go to Carrefour to speak with Haitian-American novelist Edwidge Danticat. "Haitian people are very resilient, but it doesn’t mean they can suffer more than other people," Danticat says. [includes rush transcript]