An important message for you from Amy Goodman

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Thursday, June 7, 2012

  • Resistance to NYPD’s Stop-and-Frisk Comes to D.C. as Lawmakers, Groups Urge Justice Dept. Probe

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    Dozens of New York lawmakers and several advocacy groups are convening on Capitol Hill today to call on the Justice Department to investigate the New York City Police Department’s controversial "stop-and-frisk" policies. Last year the NYPD stopped, frisked and interrogated people nearly 700,000 times — mostly black and Latino men. In all, there were more stops of young African-American men than the total population of that group in the city. "This is not about criminals. This is about a generation that’s been criminalized, targeted and brutalized by the police," says organizer Jamel Mims, a victim of stop-and-frisk. We’re also joined by NAACP President Benjamin Jealous, who is helping to organize a silent march against racial profiling in New York City on Father’s Day, June 17. "This is really the biggest, most aggressive racial profiling problem that we have in this country, and it just has to be stopped," Jealous says. [includes rush transcript]

  • Muslim Group Files Landmark Suit Challenging NYPD Surveillance in Northeast

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    Eight American Muslims from New Jersey have filed a federal lawsuit calling on the New York City Police Department to stop its surveillance and intelligence-gathering program that targets Muslim and Arab communities. Under the controversial program, New York City police officers monitored the daily life of Muslims in the tri-city area and across the Northeast — including where people ate, prayed and even where they got their hair cut. We speak to Glenn Katon, legal director at Muslim Advocates, the group that filed the lawsuit. "When the NYPD says basically all Muslims are suspect, it seems clear to us that that violates equal protection of the law," Katon says. [includes rush transcript]

  • 5 Broken Cameras: Home Videos Evolve into Stirring Film on Palestinian Resistance to Israeli Wall

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    The award-winning new documentary, "5 Broken Cameras," tells the story of a Palestinian farmer who got a video camera to record his son’s childhood, but ended up documenting the growth of the resistance movement to the Israeli separation wall in the West Bank village of Bil’in. The film shows the nonviolent tactics used by residents of Bil’in as they join with international and Israeli activists to protest the wall’s construction and confront Israeli soldiers. We speak with the film’s directors, Emad Burnat, a Palestinian, and Guy Davidi, an Israeli. [includes rush transcript]