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Thursday, July 5, 2012

  • In Win for M15 Movement, Spain Opens Criminal Probe of Ex-IMF and Bankia Chief Rodrigo Rato

    Activist

    Protesters in Spain are celebrating a major victory after the country’s high court opened a criminal investigation into Rodrigo Rato, the former head of Spain’s biggest mortgage lender, Bankia. Rato, also the ex-chief of the International Monetary Fund, has been ordered to appear in court to face criminal fraud accusations related to the downfall of Bankia, a banking giant at the center of Spain’s economic meltdown. The news marks a rare case where a former bank executive is facing a criminal probe related to the global financial crisis. Reporting from Madrid, Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman speaks with Madrid-based activist Olmo Gálvez, an organizer with ¡Democracia Real YA!, or Real Democracy Now!, part of the May 15 movement in Spain. [includes rush transcript]

  • "Something Is Starting to Happen": Spain’s M15, Precursor to Occupy, Hails Probe of Ex-IMF Chief

    Filmmaker

    A major force pushing for ex-IMF and Bankia chief Rodrigo Rato’s prosecution has been the May 15 Movement, or M15, known around the world as the "indignados." Organized largely through social media, the M15 launched massive protests in Spain over unemployment, corruption and political stagnation. In Madrid, Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman interviews Stéphane Grueso, an activist and filmmaker who is making a documentary about the M15 movement. Responding to the news of Rato’s investigation, Grueso says: "Finally it happens that, maybe, eventually, one of his kind maybe is going to pay. Because we citizens, we have this impression that none of these big guys have any problem, never. They do what they want. They steal. They lie. And [nothing ever] happens. Well, now, today, maybe [something] is starting to happen." [includes rush transcript]

  • "Zero Accountability": Glenn Greenwald on Obama’s Refusal to Prosecute Wall Street Crimes

    Glen

    Four years after the 2008 economic crisis, not a single top Wall Street executive has gone to jail. "These executives knew that they could take these huge risks and even break laws and pay no real price, and that’s what happened," says Glenn Greenwald, author of "With Liberty and Justice for Some: How the Law Is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful," and a blogger for Salon. "It’s not just a travesty of justice that we haven’t punished them for past transgressions. The real danger is that we’re continuing to send the signal to the world’s most powerful financial actors that they don’t have any fear of criminal accountability when they commit these obvious crimes." [includes rush transcript]

  • Glenn Greenwald: As WikiLeaks Reveals Syria Files, Assange Remains in Ecuador Embassy Seeking Asylum

    Assange_resized

    WikiLeaks announced today it has begun publishing the Syria Files – more than two million emails from Syrian political figures, ministries and associated companies, dating from August 2006 to March 2012. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange could not attend today’s press conference announcing the release of the data trove because he is still inside the Ecuadorean embassy in London in an attempt to avoid extradition to Sweden. According to WikiLeaks, "The Syria Files shine a light on the inner workings of the Syrian government and economy, but they also reveal how the West and Western companies say one thing and do another." Longtime WikiLeaks supporter Glenn Greenwald praises the release of the secret files. "[This] simply underscores the reason that WikiLeaks is so valuable. The ability to blow holes in the wall of secrecy behind which the world’s most powerful actors function is something that newspapers have a great deal of difficulty doing, because they’re subject to the laws of their state," Greenwald said. "They can’t guarantee anonymity, because reporters know who their sources are and can ultimately be forced to give them up." [includes rush transcript]

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