Monday, July 8, 2013

  • Sharif Abdel Kouddous: Egypt Descends Into "Spiral of Violence and Retribution" After Morsi’s Ouster

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    Deadly violence is continuing in Egypt days after the military ouster of President Mohamed Morsi. Earlier today at least 42 people were reportedly killed at the military site where Morsi is being detained. The Muslim Brotherhood says the victims were holding a peaceful sit-in when gunmen opened fire, wounding more than 500 people. The victims included women and children. The Egyptian military says it returned fire after being attacked by armed assailants. The Brotherhood has denounced the shooting as a "massacre" and is calling for an uprising against the military. Today’s shooting was the deadliest in a wave of violence that’s left dozens killed and more than 1,000 injured since Morsi was forced out of office last week. We go to Cairo to speak with Democracy Now! correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous, who has just returned from what he calls the "bloodbath" scene of the pro-Morsi rally.

  • After Morsi’s Ouster, Egypt’s Path to National Unity Threatened by Worsening Violence, Divisions

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    With the killings of at least 42 Muslim Brotherhood protesters today in Cairo, Egypt’s reconciliation effort following last week’s ouster of President Mohamed Morsi remains fraught with violence. We host a discussion on what caused Morsi’s overthrow and what comes next for Egypt with three guests: Michael Wahid Hanna, a senior fellow at The Century Foundation; Shadi Hamid, director of research for the Brookings Doha Center and a fellow at the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings; and Democracy Now! correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous based in Cairo.

  • Glenn Greenwald: "Rogue" Actions of U.S. in Snowden Row Yield Latin American Offers of Asylum

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    Venezuela, Bolivia and Nicaragua have opened the door to granting asylum to National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden in a standoff with the United States. The offers came after a plane carrying Bolivian President Evo Morales was forced to land in Austria after France and Portugal barred it from their airspace over false suspicions that Snowden was on board. The United States has refused to confirm or deny whether it was responsible. We discuss the latest with Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, who broke the NSA surveillance story based on Snowden’s leaks last month. In his latest scoop, Greenwald has revealed the NSA has systematically tapped into Brazil’s telecommunication network and indiscriminately intercepted, collected and stored the email and telephone records of millions of Brazilians for years. "The U.S. government has been its own worst enemy in this entire episode," Greenwald says. "The idea they would pressure their European allies to block the plane carrying a president of a sovereign state is a really radical and extreme act. It smacks of rogue nation status and the kind of imperialism and colonialism that Latin America has long chafed at. I think that’s the reason you’re seeing so much support for Snowden in Latin American governments and among the populations as well."

    Watch Part 2 of Interview: Glenn Greenwald: Edward Snowden 'Satisfied' by Global Outrage over U.S. Surveillance Operations

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