Afghanistan Topics

Democracy Now! has regularly covered the Afghanistan War since it was launched Oct. 7, 2001. Over the years, we have interviewed dozens of independent journalists, civilians living in the conflict zones, scholars, veterans, and antiwar activists.

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  • Wikileaks.org has done it again, publishing thousands of classified documents about the U.S. war in Afghanistan. The website provides a secure platform for whistle-blowers to deliver documents, videos and other electronic media while maintaining anonymity.
    Jul 28, 2010 | Columns & Articles
  • 20100728_julian-assange
    We spend the hour with Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, talking about the biggest leak in US history: the release of more than 91,000 classified military records on the war in Afghanistan. As the Pentagon announces it is launching a criminal probe into who leaked the documents, Assange asks what about investigating the "war crimes" revealed in the leaked military records? He also talks about the media, why he isn’t coming...
    Jul 28, 2010 | Story
  • Gibbas-assange
    The disclosure of a massive trove of classified military records documenting the Afghanistan war has ignited a firestorm and increased pressure on the White House to defend its military strategy. We play highlights of the White House press conference in Washington and Julian Assange’s press conference in London. [includes rush transcript]
    Jul 27, 2010 | Story
  • Guardian
    We speak with David Leigh, the investigations editor at The Guardian, one of the three newspapers, along with the New York Times and Der Spiegel, WikiLeaks gave the Afghanistan war documents to. "Broadly, we see a similar picture in the three media. What we do see is quite a different political perspective. From the New York Times’s point of view...it was interesting to see that the relationship with Pakistan was a political priority,"...
    Jul 27, 2010 | Story
  • Assange-dn20100726
    It’s one of the biggest leaks in US military history. More than 90,000 internal records of US military actions in Afghanistan over the past six years have been published by the whistleblower website WikiLeaks. The documents provide a devastating portrait of the war in Afghanistan, revealing how coalition forces have killed hundreds of civilians in unreported incidents, how a secret black ops special forces unit hunts down targets for assassination...
    Jul 26, 2010 | Story
  • Michael-hastings
    In a rare extended interview, we speak to Michael Hastings, whose article in Rolling Stone magazine led to the firing of General Stanley McChrystal. Hastings’ piece quoted McChrystal and his aides making disparaging remarks about top administration officials and exposed longstanding disagreements between civilian and military officials over the conduct of the war. The Senate confirmed General David Petraeus as McChrystal’s replacement...
    Jul 01, 2010 | Story
  • Conyers
    Democratic Rep. John Conyers, chair of the House Judiciary Committee and the co-chair of the Out of Afghanistan Caucus, joins us to discuss his opposition to the $33 billion earmarked for the escalation of the war in Afghanistan. Conyers and other antiwar lawmakers are holding a news conference today after the end of the bloodiest month for international troops in Afghanistan. [includes rush transcript]
    Jul 01, 2010 | Story
  • Hoh
    Last September, Matthew Hoh became the first US official known to resign in protest over the Afghan war. At the time of resignation, he was serving as the senior US civilian in Zabul province on the Pakistani border. In his resignation letter, Hoh wrote, "I have lost understanding of and confidence in the strategic purposes of the United States’ presence in Afghanistan. I have doubts and reservations about our current strategy and planned...
    Jul 01, 2010 | Story
  • The U.S. will eventually negotiate its withdrawal from Afghanistan. The only difference between now and then will be the number of dead, on all sides, and the amount of (borrowed) money that will be spent.
    Jun 30, 2010 | Columns & Articles
  • Roundtsble
    President Obama says the Afghan war will continue as planned despite his firing of General Stanley McChrystal over disparaging comments made by McChrystal and his aides about top US officials. Obama has named General David Petraeus, head of the US Central Command and architect of the surge in Iraq, as a successor. The firing of McChrystal comes at a perilous moment in the Afghan war, with June now the deadliest month for the NATO force since the...
    Jun 24, 2010 | Story