Africa Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Africa

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  • Chayes
    Watch Amy Goodman’s appearance on MSNBC’s "Up with Chris Hayes" on Sat. Dec 3rd, 2011, live from Durban, South Africa, site of the UN’s climate change conference.

    Click here to watch the full interview

    Dec 04, 2011 | D.N. in the News
  • Amys_column_default_640x360_2014
    The United Nations’ annual climate change summit descended on Durban, South Africa, this week, but not in time to prevent the tragic death of Qodeni Ximba. The 17-year-old was one of 10 people killed in Durban on Sunday, the night before the U.N. conference opened, when torrential rains pummeled the seaside city of 3.5 million.
    Nov 30, 2011 | Columns & Articles
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    American "vulture" investors, including a top funder of the Republican Party, have demanded that African nations pay over half a billion dollars for old debts, for which the investors paid only a few million. One New York vulture speculator, Peter Grossman of FG Capital Management, is demanding $100 million from the Democratic Republic of Congo. Is he collecting a legitimate debt from the Congo, or is the vulture’s claim based...
    Nov 22, 2011 | Story
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    NATO ended its bombing campaign in Libya on Monday. Over the past seven months, NATO aircraft conducted more than 26,500 sorties, including 9,700 strike missions. NATO said it bombed 5,900 military targets inside the country. While NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen hailed the campaign as a success, many analysts say NATO’s intensive bombing campaign violated its U.N. mandate. "The role that NATO played in Libya has been a...
    Nov 01, 2011 | Story
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    A new series on PBS examines the impact of conflict on women around the world. "Women, War and Peace" looks at war zones from Bosnia to Colombia to Afghanistan and beyond. The most recent episode to air, called "Pray the Devil Back to Hell," focused on the story of Liberian women who took on the warlords and the regime of dictator Charles Taylor in the midst of a bloody civil war. The documentary features Leymah Gbowee, one...
    Oct 25, 2011 | Story
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    The 2011 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to a trio of recipients: Yemeni activist Tawakkul Karman, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, and Liberian peace activist Leymah Gbowee. The three women were cited "for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work." The trio of laureates follow only a dozen other women among 85 men to have won the prize...
    Oct 07, 2011 | Story
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    For Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the Nobel Peace Prize announcement comes as she wraps up her reelection campaign. Voters in Liberia head to the polls on Tuesday. The other Liberian Nobel winner, Leymah Gbowee, is the founder of the Women for Peace movement, credited by some for bringing an end to the civil war in 2003. The movement started humbly in 2002, when Gbowee organized a group of women to sing and pray for an end to...
    Oct 07, 2011 | Story
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    In Somalia, at least 70 people were killed yesterday in the capital of Mogadishu after a large truck bomb exploded near a government compound that housed the Somali cabinet and eight ministries, including the Ministry of Education. The militant group al-Shabab claimed responsibility for the attack, which maintains control of much of southern Somalia. Many in the country blame its refusal to accept Western aid for causing the deadly famine now...
    Oct 05, 2011 | Story
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    The United States has confirmed the killing of the radical Yemeni-American cleric, Anwar al-Awlaki, in northern Yemen. The Obama administration says al-Awlaki is one of the most influential al-Qaeda operatives on its "most wanted" list. In response to news of al-Awlaki’s death, constitutional scholar Glenn Greenwald and others argue the assassination of U.S. citizens without due process has now has become a reality. "One...
    Sep 30, 2011 | Story
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    The Kenyan environmentalist Wangari Maathai, the first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize, died on Sunday at the age of 71 after a battle with cancer. In 1977, she spearheaded the struggle against state-backed deforestation in Kenya and founded the Green Belt Movement, which has planted tens of millions of trees in the country. She has also been an outspoken advocate for women’s rights and democratic development. In 1984 ,she won...
    Sep 29, 2011 | Story