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African-American History Topics

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Search our vast archive of interviews with scholars, journalists, activists, key political figures, and authors.

Newest First | Oldest First
  • Splash_image20120113-1298-hph7vq-0
    "Makeda," the new novel by TransAfrica founder Randall Robinson, is set at the dawn of the civil rights era. The book follows a young man coming of age in segregated Richmond, Virginia, who discovers his roots in Africa through his blind grandmother. "Sometimes when we think of slavery, we calculate the economic consequence of it," Robinson says. "But we have not calculated the psychosocial consequence of it, unless we...
    January 13, 2012 | Story
  • Splash_image20120113-2379-lkw5qu-0
    On this eve of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday, we host a wide-ranging discussion with TransAfrica founder Randall Robinson and author Michelle Alexander about the mass incarceration of African Americans that has rolled back many achievements of the civil rights movement. Today there are more African Americans under correctional control, whether in prison or jail, on probation or on parole, than there were enslaved in 1850. And more...
    January 13, 2012 | Story
  • Splash_image20120111-30804-hvsuyp-0
    Ahead of the Monday holiday celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr., we speak with two people key to establishing the day as a paid state holiday in New Hampshire—the last state to do so—replacing its optional Civil Rights Day in 1999. "I look at Mitt Romney talking about saving the soul of America and recall that the motto of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was 'to redeem the soul of America,'" says Arnie Alpert,...
    January 11, 2012 | Story
  • Splash_image20120106-26952-1aanlnc-0
    The family of a Dallas teenager Jakadrien Turner is demanding answers after she was deported to Colombia, despite the fact that she is a U.S. citizen and speaks no Spanish. Turner, a 15-year-old African-American runaway, was living in Houston when she was arrested for shoplifting and gave police a fake name that belonged to a 22-year-old undocumented immigrant from Colombia with warrants for her arrest. The Immigration and Customs Enforcement...
    January 06, 2012 | Story
  • Play_mondayshow_yip
    His name might not be familiar to many, but his songs are sung by millions around the world. Today, we take a journey through the life and work of Yip Harburg, the Broadway lyricist who wrote such hits as "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" and who put the music into The Wizard of Oz. Born into poverty on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Yip always included a strong social and political component to his work, fighting racism and...
    December 26, 2011 | Story
  • Washington_web
    One of the major themes raised by the Occupy movement is the increasing power of large corporations over more and more aspects of our lives. We spend the hour looking into the issue of the corporate control of life itself. Our guest, Harriet Washington, is a medical ethicist and has just published a book that examines the extent to which what she calls the medical-industrial complex has come to control human life. In the past 30 years, more...
    October 31, 2011 | Story
  • Amys_column_default_640x360_2014
    The national memorial to Martin Luther King Jr. was dedicated last Sunday. President Barack Obama said of Dr. King, “If he were alive today, I believe he would remind us that the unemployed worker can rightly challenge the excesses of Wall Street without demonizing all who work there.” The dedication occurred amidst the increasingly popular and increasingly global Occupy Wall Street movement. What Obama left unsaid is that King, were he alive,...
    October 19, 2011 | Columns & Articles
  • Splash_image20111020-1909-17h2hx3-0
    A new report by the University of New Hampshire reveals that nearly 22 percent of America’s children live in poverty. Another study by the the Pew Hispanic Center found that Hispanics now make up the largest group of children living in poverty: 6.1 million Hispanic children are poor, compared with five million non-Hispanic white children and 4.4 million black children. The Pew Center said Hispanic poverty numbers have dramatically...
    October 19, 2011 | Story
  • Splash_image20111013-2731-soia68-0
    After seven years of research, the groundbreaking new book, "News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media," examines how the media has played a pivotal role in perpetuating racist views in the United States. It recalls lives of the unsung pioneering black, Latino, Native American and Asian-American journalists who challenged the worst racial aspects of the white-owned media. It also tells the untold story of...
    October 13, 2011 | Story
  • Johncarloszirinwebexv2
    In part two of our interview with 1968 Olympic medalist and international civil rights icon, John Carlos, he talks about the shocked response of the audience in the stadium when he raised his fist in the now iconic Black Power salute, and much more. [includes rush transcript]
    October 12, 2011 | Web Exclusive