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Anjali Kamat Topics

Anjali Kamat is a correspondent for Democracy Now! currently reporting from India, Egypt and Libya.

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  • Anjali
    Anti-government protesters have taken control of large swaths of Libya in the uprising against Colonel Muammar Gaddafi. It remains unclear how many people have been killed in Gaddafi’s brutal crackdown, but estimates have topped 1,000. Democracy Now! correspondent Anjali Kamat reports from the Libyan city of Tobruk. [includes rush transcript]
    Feb 24, 2011 | Story
  • Ali
    Since the popular uprising that toppled former President Hosni Mubarak, thousands of employees across Egypt have walked out on strike. Their demands range from rising wages to removing corrupt officials affiliated with Mubarak’s National Democratic Party. Democracy Now! correspondent Anjali Kamat speaks to Khaled Ali, a labor lawyer with the Egyptian Center for Economic and Social Rights. [includes rush transcript]
    Feb 18, 2011 | Story
  • Anjali_egypt
    Democracy Now! correspondent Anjali Kamat was in the streets of Cairo as Egyptians erupted with joy after learning President Hosni Mubarak had stepped down following 18 days of street protests that began on January 25. In this video report, Kamat takes us to Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where people are not only cleaning up the streets but are also maintaining their rights to public political expression and involvement in Egypt’s uncertain future....
    Feb 14, 2011 | Story
  • CAIRO–The sounds of freedom continue to ring through Cairo, twenty-four hours after Hosni Mubarak was forced to resign by the awe-inspiring resilience and courage of millions of Egyptians who poured onto the streets in unprecedented numbers for 18 continuous days. After three decades of authoritarian rule, the impossible has come to pass; the hated dictator is gone and his notorious police force has all but vanished.
    Feb 12, 2011 | News
  • Temp-image_1_357
    As news of Hosni Mubarak’s resignation breaks, Democracy Now! broadcasts live reaction from Tahrir Square and beyond with Senior Producer Sharif Abdel Kouddous and Correspondent Anjali Kamat. "People are holding their hands up in victory," reports Kouddous. "This will be a day that no one will ever forget." We are also joined on the phone from Cairo by Egyptian activists Mona El Seif and Salma al-Tarzi, blogger Alaa...
    Feb 11, 2011 | Web Exclusive
  • Sharif-anjali
    Massive demonstrations are being held in cities across Egypt, including Cairo, Mahalla, Tanta, Alexandria, Ismailia and Suez. In Cairo, protesters have expanded their rallies beyond Tahrir Square to several government buildings, including the presidential palace, the parliament and the offices of Egyptian state television. We get a live report from Cairo with Democracy Now!’s Sharif Abdel Kouddous and Anjali Kamat. [includes rush transcript]
    Feb 11, 2011 | Story
  • Activist-1
    We speak with Egyptian blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah, who calls in from a major protest outside the Egyptian state TV headquarters in Cairo. Other protesters are marching on the presidential palace. Democracy Now!’s Sharif Abdel Kouddous and Anjali Kamat review updates from the streets across Egypt from a studio in Cairo. [includes rush transcript]
    Feb 11, 2011 | Story
  • Democracy Now! correspondent Anjali Kamat reports about 5,000 people filled with "a mixture of rage and sadness" marched from Tahrir Square to the Egyptian state television building after Pres. Hosni Mubarak’s address. "The state television building is emblematic of the power of the state against the people and the way it’s been using this power to paint the people in Tahrir in a negative light," says Kamat....
    Feb 10, 2011 | Web Exclusive
  • Anjali
    Democracy Now! correspondent Anjali Kamat reports on the festive atmosphere in Tahrir Square last night following a record-level turnout of protesters: “People are really taking care of each other very well, giving each other food, water and blankets. It was a very moving experience,” Kamat says. [includes rush transcript]
    Feb 09, 2011 | Story
  • Egypt-rev
    In a special Saturday edition, Democracy Now! airs a two-hour broadcast. Highlights include:

    • Live Reports from Cairo with Democracy Now! senior producer Sharif Abdel Kouddous and Democracy Now! correspondent Anjali Kamat.
    • Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif on how life in Tahrir Square "is truly democracy in action."
    • Columbia professor Rashid Khalidi on the impact of the Egyptian and Tunisian uprisings on the Middle East.
    • Mohamed Abdel Dayem...
    Feb 05, 2011 | Story