Art & Politics Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Art & Politics

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  • As we approach the fortieth anniversary of the Woodstock music and art fair, the new documentary Back to Woodstock by filmmaker Julie Cohen tells the story of six people whose lives were transformed by one of the defining cultural events of a generation. It was a counter-cultural festival of peace and love in the midst of the turbulent ’60s, a time when the Vietnam War and racial tensions were at their height. [includes rush transcript]
    Aug 07, 2009 | Story
  • Utah Phillips, the legendary folk musician and peace and labor activist, died earlier this year at the age of seventy-three. Over the span of nearly four decades, Utah Phillips worked in what he referred to as “the Trade,” performing tirelessly throughout the United States, Canada and Europe. The son of labor organizers, Phillips was a lifelong member of the Industrial Workers of the World, known as the Wobblies. As a teenager, he ran away...
    Sep 07, 2009 | Story
  • A protest at the Toronto International Film Festival has taken center stage after a group of artists and writers signed a letter of protest against the festival’s decision to spotlight the city of Tel Aviv. Activists say the TIFF spotlight plays into Israel’s attempt to improve its global image in the wake of the assault on the Gaza Strip and the ongoing occupation of Palestinian land. Over 1,500 people have signed the letter,...
    Sep 14, 2009 | Story
  • Buffysm-web
    In a Democracy Now! special, an hour of conversation and music with Cree Indian singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie. In the turbulent 1960s, she was just out of college but already famous for her beautiful voice and moving lyrics in songs like "Universal Soldier" and "Now that the Buffalo’s Gone." Over the years, Buffy Sainte-Marie has worked with the American Indian Movement, but also with Sesame Street, and even...
    Oct 12, 2009 | Story
  • His name might not be familiar to many, but his songs are sung by millions around the world. Today, a journey through the life and work of Yip Harburg, the Broadway lyricist who wrote such hits as “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” and who put the music into The Wizard of Oz. Born into poverty on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Yip always included a strong social and political component to his work, fighting racism and poverty. A lifelong...
    Nov 16, 2009 | Story
  • Buffysm-web
    In a Democracy Now! special, an hour of conversation and music with Cree Indian singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie. In the turbulent 1960s, she was just out of college but already famous for her beautiful voice and moving lyrics in songs like “Universal Soldier” and “Now that the Buffalo’s Gone.” Over the years, Buffy Sainte-Marie has worked with the American Indian Movement, but also with Sesame Street, and even Hollywood, winning an...
    Nov 26, 2009 | Story
  • Brutusweb
    Renowned South African poet and activist Dennis Brutus died in his sleep Saturday in Cape Town. He was eighty-five years old. Brutus was a leading opponent of the apartheid state and was imprisoned with Nelson Mandela on Robben Island. We hear highlights of an interview with Brutus on Democracy Now! and speak with his close friend and colleague, Patrick Bond. [includes rush transcript]
    Dec 28, 2009 | Story
  • Dennis Brutus broke rocks next to Nelson Mandela when they were imprisoned together on notorious Robben Island. His crime, like Mandela’s, was fighting the injustice of racism, challenging South Africa’s apartheid regime. Brutus’ weapons were his words: soaring, searing, poetic.
    Dec 31, 2009 | Columns & Articles
  • 20100125robertthumb
    Democracy Now! broadcasts from Park City, Utah, home of the Sundance Film Festival, the nation’s largest festival for independent cinema. Today, we spend the hour with Robert Redford. He’s well known as an actor, but part and parcel of who he is is an activist. He took his success and leveraged it to promote his real passions: environmental justice, Native American rights and independent filmmaking. Since 1980, through the Sundance Film...
    Jan 25, 2010 | Story
  • Bilal-democracynow
    The official death toll from the war is 100,000, but it is widely estimated to be much higher, perhaps even as high as one million. In his latest piece of artwork, Iraqi American artist Wafaa Bilal tries to grapple with the enormity of these numbers. It’s a twenty-four-hour live tattooing performance called "...and Counting" that began at the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts gallery in New York Monday night. By tonight...
    Mar 09, 2010 | Story