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Civilrights

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Civil Rights

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  • Fair
    On the 50th anniversary of the 1964 World’s Fair in New York City, which drew 51 million visitors over the span of two years, we look at the untold history of massive protests highlighting racial and economic inequality — and to demand equitable hiring practices at the international event. "We got 700 people from around the country to come in, to sit in at pavilions, to say we want the passage of the civil rights bill, and...
    Apr 25, 2014 | Story
  • Black_fdny
    Some 1,500 Black and Latino applicants to the Fire Department of New York have settled a long-running lawsuit with the city and the Justice Department over racially discriminatory hiring practices at the nation’s largest fire department. The agreement grants almost $100 million in back pay to those impacted. When the case was filed in 2007, the Fire Department was 90 percent white, even though African Americans and Latinos totaled half...
    Mar 19, 2014 | Story
  • Debo_adegbile
    In a stunning vote, a group of U.S. Senate Democrats has broken ranks to join Republicans in rejecting President Obama’s pick to head the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, Debo Adegbile. The confirmation fight focused almost solely on Adegbile’s role in the legal defense of imprisoned Black Panther Mumia Abu-Jamal, who was convicted of killing a Philadelphia police officer, despite Abu-Jamal’s longstanding...
    Mar 06, 2014 | Story
  • Angela_davis
    For more than four decades, the world-renowned author, activist and scholar Angela Davis has been one of most influential activists and intellectuals in the United States. An icon of the 1970s black liberation movement, Davis’ work around issues of gender, race, class and prisons has influenced critical thought and social movements across several generations. She is a leading advocate for prison abolition, a position informed by her own...
    Mar 06, 2014 | Story
  • Amys_column_default_640x360_2014
    The world lost a visionary activist this week, with the death of Chokwe Lumumba, the newly elected mayor of Jackson, Miss.
    Feb 27, 2014 | Columns & Articles
  • Lumumba
    Local officials confirm the tragic news that longtime black nationalist organizer and attorney Chokwe Lumumba has died of heart failure. He was 66. Watch our interview with Lumumba just after he was elected mayor of Jackson, Mississippi last June, when he said, "we’re about to make some advances and some strides in the development of human rights and the protection of human rights that I think have not been seen in other parts of the...
    Feb 26, 2014 | Web Exclusive
  • Lumumba2
    In Mississippi, the city of Jackson is grieving today following the sudden death of Mayor Chokwe Lumumba, less than a year after he was elected. He suffered from heart failure on Tuesday. A longtime black nationalist organizer and attorney, Lumumba had been described as "America’s most revolutionary mayor." Working with the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, Lumumba advocated for participatory democracy and the creation of new...
    Feb 26, 2014 | Story
  • Spiesof_ms4
    In part two of our interview about the new film, "Spies of Mississippi," we continue our look at how the Mississippi state government spied on civil rights activists in the 1950s and 1960s. [includes rush transcript]
    Feb 25, 2014 | Web Exclusive
  • Spies_of_mississippi1
    A new documentary reveals how the Mississippi state government spied on civil rights activists in the 1950s and 1960s. A little-known state agency called the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission hired spies to infiltrate the civil rights movement and squash attempts to desegregate the state and register African Americans to vote. Some of the spies were themselves African-American. The Commission generated more than 160,000 pages of reports, many...
    Feb 25, 2014 | Story
  • Amys_column_default_640x360_2014
    By Amy Goodman & Denis Moynihan

    “I found myself standing in front of railroad tracks in South Florida. I was waiting on the train to come so I could jump in front of it and end my life.” So recounted Desmond Meade, describing his life nine years ago. He was homeless, unemployed, recently released from prison and addicted to drugs and alcohol. The train never came. He crossed the tracks and checked himself into a substance-abuse program. He...

    Feb 13, 2014 | Columns & Articles