Don't Ask Don't Tell Policy Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Don't Ask Don't Tell Policy

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  • Serveopenlysign
    For the first time, the Pentagon’s top leaders have called for an end to "don’t ask, don’t tell," the military policy barring gay men and lesbians from serving openly in the military. We get reaction from Alexander Nicholson, a former Army intelligence officer who was discharged for being gay, and Nathaniel Frank, author of Unfriendly Fire: How the Gay Ban Undermines the Military and Weakens America. [includes rush...
    Feb 03, 2010 | Story
  • Kagan-nomination
    President Obama is nominating Solicitor General Elena Kagan to the Supreme Court. He is scheduled to make the announcement this morning at the White House. Kagan would replace retiring Justice John Paul Stevens on the bench. If confirmed, the fifty-year-old Kagan would be the Court’s youngest member. She would become the fourth female Supreme Court justice in US history and the third on the Court’s current bench. She would also be...
    May 10, 2010 | Story
  • Dan-choi
    “As we mark the end of America’s combat mission in Iraq,” President Barack Obama said this week, “a grateful America must pay tribute to all who served there.” He should have added “unless you’re gay,” because, despite his rhetoric, weeks earlier the commander-in-chief fired one of those Iraq vets: Lt. Dan Choi. Choi is a West Point graduate, an Arabic linguist and an Iraq war veteran. He was fired under the military’s "Don’t...
    Aug 04, 2010 | Story
  • Amys_column_default_640x360_2014
    Dan Choi was an Iraq War veteran, a graduate of West Point and a trained Arabic linguist. I ran into Choi the day after he received his official discharge for violating the military’s so-called "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" policy.
    Aug 04, 2010 | Columns & Articles
  • Dadt
    A federal judge has ruled the military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy toward gay and lesbian members of the military is unconstitutional. Judge Virginia Phillips said she will issue an injunction that will halt the enforcement of the policy that allows gay men and lesbian to serve in the armed forces as long as they do not disclose their orientation and do not engage in homosexual acts. [includes rush transcript]
    Sep 10, 2010 | Story
  • Serveopenlysign
    The Nation's Richard Kim joins us to discuss some of the major issues facing the gay rights movement in America today, including Tuesday's decision by a federal judge to end the military’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy; the surge in gay teenagers committing suicide; the homophobic remarks of politicians ahead of the midterm elections; and the recent brutal beatings and torture of three New York men because of their...
    Oct 13, 2010 | Story
  • Dadt
    The military’s seventeen-year-old ban on openly gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people from joining the US military is back on the books. But based on a new directive, only five senior military officials will be able to discharge service members for violating the policy. The change makes it harder for the military to remove openly gay troops. We speak to one of the most vocal critics of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, Lt. Dan Choi, who...
    Oct 22, 2010 | Story
  • Gay_debate
    We host a debate on whether the queer rights movement should be focused on repealing the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell law between Lt. Dan Choi and queer antiwar activist and writer Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore. Celebrating the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, Sycamore says, only makes progressive movements in the US complicit with American wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan. [includes rush transcript]
    Oct 22, 2010 | Story
  • Dadt-repealed
    The Senate voted 63 to 31 on Thursday to repeal the military’s "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" policy. Eight Republicans joined with Democrats to approve the repeal and send the measure to President Obama for his signature. The bill passed in the House last week. We speak with former Navy commander Zoe Dunning. Until her retirement three years ago, she was thought to be the only openly gay person serving in the U.S....
    Dec 20, 2010 | Story
  • Greenwald_doma
    The U.S. Department of Justice has announced it will no longer defend the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, which bars federal recognition of same-sex marriages. Glenn Greenwald, a constitutional law attorney and legal blogger for Salon.com, who is openly gay, talks about the significance of this decision and how DOMA affected his own choice to live in Brazil with his partner, a Brazilian national. "This is one of those rare instances where I...
    Feb 24, 2011 | Story