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Healthcare Topics

Democracy Now! continues to closely follow the movement to reform the healthcare system in the United States. We have interviewed policy makers, doctors, patients, independent journalists, academics, single payer healthcare advocates, and filmmakers.

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  • Dr._paul_farmer
    Dr. Paul Farmer, an infectious diseases expert and a medical anthropologist, is known worldwide for helping to bring quality healthcare to some of the most impoverished areas of the globe. More than 25 years ago, Farmer helped found the charity Partners in Health to provide free medical care in central Haiti. Today, Partners in Health teams up with local groups to treat people with HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other conditions in Haiti...
    May 14, 2013 | Story
  • Imara_jones
    The word of the month in Washington is "sequestration," or the automatic $85 billion in spending cuts slated to take effect on March 1 unless Congress reaches a deal. What will those cuts mean in real life for the poor, unemployed, sick and children? Reporter Imara Jones of ColorLines.com joins us to discuss how the damage will stretch far beyond jobs, forcing a dramatic pullback in critical areas like health, education, housing and...
    February 21, 2013 | Story
  • Gabor_mate
    Today, a Democracy Now! special with the Canadian physician and bestselling author, Dr. Gabor Maté. From disease to addiction, parenting to attention deficit disorder, Maté’s work focuses on the centrality of early childhood experiences to the development of the brain, and how those experiences can impact everything from behavioral patterns to physical and mental illness. While the relationship between emotional stress and disease, and mental...
    December 25, 2012 | Story
  • Peltier_phone
    Leonard Peltier, one of the nation’s most well-known and longest-incarcerated prisoners, speaks out from the U.S. Penitentiary at Coleman, Florida, where he is currently held. Peltier is the Native American activist and former member of the American Indian Movement who was convicted of aiding in the killing of two FBI agents during a shootout on South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in 1975. Sentenced to prison in 1977,...
    December 19, 2012 | Story
  • Guzman_bouvard-2
    The month of July set a record high for the number of suicides in the U.S. military. An Army report reveals a total of 38 troops committed suicide last month, including 26 active-duty soldiers and 12 Army National Guard or reserve members — more soldiers than were killed on the battlefield. The reasons for the increase in suicides are not fully understood. Among explanations, studies point to combat exposure, post-traumatic stress,...
    August 21, 2012 | Story
  • Ryan-social_security
    Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney’s newly picked running mate, Paul Ryan, is on the forefront of efforts to dismantle Social Security by putting seniors’ savings into risky Wall Street investments. Over the years, Ryan has not only pushed for privatizing Social Security, but also dismantling Medicare and slashing funding for Medicaid. In the Republican response to President Obama’s 2011 State of the Union address, Ryan...
    August 15, 2012 | Story
  • Brown_berlin_patient_aids
    As researchers continue to look for a possible cure for HIV/AIDS, we turn to the remarkable story of Timothy Ray Brown, known in the medical world as the "Berlin patient." He is the first person believed to have been cured of HIV. "I was diagnosed in 1995 with HIV, and I was scared to death because, at that point, people were dying from the disease itself and also form the only available drug at that time, AZT," Brown...
    July 27, 2012 | Story
  • Anglican_byamugisha_hiv
    We’re joined from the International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C., by Rev. Canon Gideon Byamugisha. A prominent church leader in Uganda, in 1992 he became the first African religious leader to openly declare his HIV-positive status. He has since devoted his life to an AIDS ministry that works to end the stigma around the disease. Rev. Byamugisha discusses his historic decision and the ongoing discrimination against LGBTQ people in...
    July 27, 2012 | Story
  • Lewis
    The world’s largest international AIDS conference concludes today in Washington, D.C. It was the first time in 22 years that the United States hosted the conference, due to the Obama administration’s reversal of a two-decade ban that prevented people infected with HIV from entering the country. We speak to Stephen Lewis, co-founder and co-director of AIDS-Free World. From 2001 to 2006, he served as the U.N....
    July 27, 2012 | Story
  • Picture_30
    The Supreme Court has upheld the Affordable Care Act, President Obama’s signature bill, clearing the way for the largest revamp of America’s healthcare system since the 1960s. We get reaction from acclaimed filmmaker Michael Moore, whose 2007 documentary, "Sicko," tackled many failures of the U.S. healthcare system. "This really is a huge victory for our side, in spite of all of my concerns with this law," Moore...
    June 29, 2012 | Story