RNC 2008 Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to RNC 2008

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  • On Sunday, Veterans for Peace, a large national organization made up of veterans of every war, from Korea to Vietnam and Iraq, led a protest in the streets of St. Paul against the Republican National Convention. Among the members of Vets for Peace, there is a sizable contingent of Vietnam War vets. So, too, is the man they are demonstrating against: the presumptive presidential nominee John McCain. Democracy Now! correspondent Jeremy Scahill...
    Sep 01, 2008 | Story
  • Nearly two million residents have fled from coastal Louisiana and New Orleans as Hurricane Gustav heads towards the Gulf Coast, but tens of thousands have also left coastal Mississippi, Alabama and southeastern Texas. Hurricane Gustav has also jeopardized this week’s Republican National Convention in St. Paul, where Republican officials are already scaling back the RNC program. Despite the Bush administration drawing widespread criticism...
    Sep 01, 2008 | Story
  • The protests against the Republican convention have barely begun, but the police have already begun their crackdown against anyone perceived to be involved the demonstrations. Police in the Twin Cities worked with federal officials to detain dozens of activists and conduct a series of coordinated raids on a number of locations. Among them was Democracy Now!’s Elizabeth Press, who was detained, along with several others, in a house raid...
    Sep 01, 2008 | Story
  • Democracy Now! runs into New York Times columnist David Brooks at the Minneapolis-St. Paul airport. We get his reaction to Barack Obama’s nomination acceptance speech in Denver, John McCain’s choice of Sarah Palin for the vice-presidential nomination, and the effect Hurricane Gustav will have on the Republican convention. "McCain should go down to New Orleans, grab onto a light post Geraldo-style and do the speech sideways,...
    Sep 01, 2008 | Story
  • Open opposition, the right to challenge those in power, is a mainstay of any healthy democracy. The Democratic and Republican conventions will test the commitment of the two dominant U.S. political parties to the cherished tradition of dissent. Things are not looking good.

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    Aug 14, 2008 | Columns & Articles