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South Africa Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to South Africa

Newest First | Oldest First
  • On the day of announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize, we play an interview with another Nobel Peace Prize winner — Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Earlier this week he turned 75 years old. [includes rush transcript]
    Oct 13, 2006 | Story
  • Diamond giant De Beers celebrated the opening of its first retail store in the United States amid protests decrying the company’s involvement in the eviction of the San Bushmen in Botswana. We speak to the Bushmen organization First People of the Kalahari, rights group Survival International, feminist pioneer Gloria Steinem, and a De Beers consultant. [includes rush transcript]
    Jun 23, 2005 | Story
  • We speak with South African poet and activist Dennis Brutus who recently initiated the launch of a campaign against Barclays Bank, demanding reparations for vast apartheid profits. [includes rush transcript]
    Jun 16, 2005 | Story
  • Nobel Peace prize-winner Archbishop Desmond Tutu speaks after receiving an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Fordham University. He says, "South Africa, improbably, divinely amusingly, has become a beacon of hope. If peace could come to South Africa, then peace could come any- and everywhere." [includes rush transcript]
    Feb 24, 2005 | Story
  • Salih Booker, head of Africa Action comments on Jesse Helm’s retirement announcement and his record on Africa. Africa Action will request reparations for slavery, the ending of Global Apartheid, aid for the AIDS pandemic, and more in its fight for racial justice, and at the upcoming UN Conference Against Racism to be held in Durban, South Africa.
    Aug 23, 2001 | Story
  • In 1990, three months after the release of Nelson Mandela, the De Klerk Government sent Father Michael Lapsley aparcel containing two magazines. Inside one of them was a highly sophisticated bomb. When Lapsley opened themagazine, the explosion brought down ceilings in the house and blew a hole in the floors and shattered windows. Italso blew off both of the priest’s hands, ruined one eye and burned him severely.
    Apr 03, 2001 | Story
  • Yesterday we were joined by Justice Albie Sachs, South African activist and lawyer.
    Oct 25, 2000 | Story
  • Thabo Mbeki became South Africa’s second post-apartheid president today, taking over the leadership from Nelson Mandela with promises to improve the lives of millions of impoverished South Africans. Seconds after Mbeki took oath in the South African capital of Pretoria, Mandela and his successor held hands high above their heads in a victory salute before a cheering crowd.
    Jun 16, 1999 | Story
  • South Africa’s next president, Thabo Mbeki, said that the country’s second post-apartheid election has delivered an overwhelming mandate to the ruling African National Congress (ANC). Mbeki, a former underground activist for the ANC, was South African President Nelson Mandela’s deputy president, and was picked by Mandela as his successor.
    Jun 03, 1999 | Story
  • South African police this week attacked one of the country’s star soccer players during a traffic stop, beating him and shooting him in the shoulder as he rode in his car with his sister. Lifa Gqosha, midfielder for the Kaizer Cheifs, the nation’s most popular soccer team, was assaulted after the police pulled him over and questioned whether he owned the car he was driving. Gqosha is black, and the officers were white.
    Apr 30, 1999 | Story