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Friday, January 17, 1997 FULL SHOW | HEADLINES | NEXT: The FBI and Electronic Surveillance
1997-01-17

Korean Strikers and New Governmental Security Agency

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For more than three weeks, South Korea has been hit by a wave of nationwide strikes. Workers are protesting the secret passage of a new labor law that gives sweeping powers to big Korean corporations — like Samsung, Hyundai and Daewoo — to lay off workers, replace strikers and extend work hours. The government of President Kim Young Sam also passed a law giving new powers to the Agency for National Security Planning, also known as the Korean CIA.

GUESTS:

JINSOOK LEE, the director of the Korea Information Project, a clearinghouse and resource center on Korea based in the Washington DC area.

TIM SHORROCK, an American journalist who has covered Korea extensively for a number of years. He wrote a piece last December for The Nation magazine called "Debacle in Kwangju," which outlined the U.S. role in the 1980 Kwangju massacre.


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