Tuesday, July 9, 2013

  • Edward Snowden on Why He Stood Up to the NSA: Mass Spying "Not Something I’m Willing to Live Under"

    Snowden

    In a newly released interviewed conducted just before he came forward early last month, Edward Snowden explains why he has devoted his life to expose how the United States is spying on the world. Snowden says he thinks the biggest revelation to emerge from his leaks is the National Security Agency’s collection of all communications into and out of the United States — despite NSA claims that it only targets foreign traffic. Snowden also predicts that the U.S. government would seek to demonize him and accuse him of aiding America’s enemies. Journalist Laura Poitras filmed the exchange, and Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald asked the questions. "America is a fundamentally good country," Snowden says. "We have good people with good values who want to do the right thing, but the structures of power that exist are working to their own ends to extend their capability at the expense of the freedoms of all." Watch part 1 of the Snowden interview.

  • Glenn Greenwald: Snowden Encouraged by Global Outrage over NSA Spying, Support for His Plight

    Greenwald

    In part two of our interview from Monday, Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald details his conversation with National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden over the weekend. Greenwald says he spoke at length with Snowden for the first time since Snowden left Hong Kong last month. "He is enthused about the developments over the last week, both in terms of ongoing revelations and the ongoing debate that he helped trigger about surveillance policy worldwide, as well as the support that he’s getting from around the world," Greenwald says. "He only had one fear, and that was that he would sacrifice his life and take these enormous personal risks in order to make these disclosures possible, and then have the world react with indifference and apathy." On why Snowden has chosen to become a whistleblower, Greenwald adds: "He began thinking the U.S. government was the most noble government in the world and wanted to work and devote his career to supporting its policies. And it was only over time, gradually, that he began seeing all sorts of things and thought critically about them, just like Bradley Manning did, who joined the U.S. military with the same thoughts and only gradually began to see it as a force for evil. That is Mr. Snowden’s evolution."

  • Exclusive: Ecuador’s Foreign Minister on Snowden, Assange & Latin American Resistance to U.S. Spying

    Ricardo

    Amidst new revelations of U.S. spying in Latin America and ongoing diplomatic tensions over the asylum efforts of Edward Snowden, we are joined by Ecuadorean Foreign Minister Ricardo Patiño. Speaking from Quito, Patiño addresses the confusion over Ecuador’s ties to Snowden’s asylum bid after initially granting him a temporary travel document but later calling the action a "mistake." Patiño also comments on the diplomatic fallout over the forced landing in Austria of a plane carrying Bolivian President Evo Morales following rumors that Snowden was on board. And Patiño gives an update on Ecuador’s efforts to resolve the standoff over WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who remains holed up in Ecuador’s London embassy as the British government refuses to allow his departure to Ecuador after receiving political asylum. [Click here to watch/read this interview in Spanish]