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Mississippi Topics

Democracy Now! stories, posts and pages that relate to Mississippi

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  • 2014-1126_seg2_neshoba-1
    At the Presidential Medal of Freedom ceremony on Monday, President Obama honored James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Mickey Schwerner, the three civil rights workers who were killed 50 years ago by the Ku Klux Klan after traveling to Mississippi to register black voters. "In that Freedom Summer, these three Americans refused to sit on the sidelines," Obama said. "Their brutal murder by a gang of Ku Klux Klan members shook the...
    November 26, 2014 | Story
  • Freedomsummer5
    This week marks the 50th anniversary of the murders of three young civil rights workers who traveled to Mississippi for Freedom Summer, the historic campaign to register African-American voters. On June 21, 1964, James Chaney, Andy Goodman and Michael Schwerner went missing after they visited a church in Neshoba County, Mississippi, which the Ku Klux Klan had bombed because it was going to be used as a Freedom School. Forty-four days after the...
    June 26, 2014 | Story
  • Voting4
    In a week marking the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, Mississippi was in the news when African-American voters crossed party lines to help Republican Sen. Thad Cochran narrowly defeat a tea party challenger to win his party’s nomination. It was just a year ago that Cochran praised a Supreme Court decision that gutted the heart of the Voting Rights Act. We are joined by three guests: Jerry Mitchell, investigative reporter for The...
    June 26, 2014 | Story
  • Amys_column_default_640x360_2014
    The world lost a visionary activist this week, with the death of Chokwe Lumumba, the newly elected mayor of Jackson, Miss.
    February 27, 2014 | Columns & Articles
  • Lumumba
    Local officials confirm the tragic news that longtime black nationalist organizer and attorney Chokwe Lumumba has died of heart failure. He was 66. Watch our interview with Lumumba just after he was elected mayor of Jackson, Mississippi last June, when he said, "we’re about to make some advances and some strides in the development of human rights and the protection of human rights that I think have not been seen in other parts of the...
    February 25, 2014 | Web Exclusive
  • Lumumba2
    In Mississippi, the city of Jackson is grieving today following the sudden death of Mayor Chokwe Lumumba, less than a year after he was elected. He suffered from heart failure on Tuesday. A longtime black nationalist organizer and attorney, Lumumba had been described as "America’s most revolutionary mayor." Working with the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, Lumumba advocated for participatory democracy and the creation of new...
    February 26, 2014 | Story
  • Spiesof_ms4
    In part two of our interview about the new film, "Spies of Mississippi," we continue our look at how the Mississippi state government spied on civil rights activists in the 1950s and 1960s. [includes rush transcript]
    February 25, 2014 | Web Exclusive
  • Spies_of_mississippi1
    A new documentary reveals how the Mississippi state government spied on civil rights activists in the 1950s and 1960s. A little-known state agency called the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission hired spies to infiltrate the civil rights movement and squash attempts to desegregate the state and register African Americans to vote. Some of the spies were themselves African-American. The Commission generated more than 160,000 pages of reports, many...
    February 25, 2014 | Story
  • Lumumba
    Just days before the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Medgar Evers in Jackson, Mississippi, the city’s voters have elected longtime black nationalist organizer and attorney Chokwe Lumumba to become mayor. Describing himself as a "Fannie Lou Hamer Democrat," Lumumba surprised many political observers by winning the Democratic primary, despite being outspent five to one. He went on to easily win this week’s general...
    June 06, 2013 | Story
  • Willie_jerome_manning
    The Mississippi Supreme Court has blocked the execution of Willie Jerome Manning just hours before he was scheduled to die. The case attracted national attention after the FBI admitted that its original analysis of the evidence in Manning’s case contained errors. Last week the Mississippi Supreme Court refused to allow new DNA testing that could prove Manning’s innocence.
    May 07, 2013 | Web Exclusive