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HeadlinesOctober 17, 1997

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Military-Wide Security Review Ordered After Arrests of 13 Suspected of Trafficking Military Explosives

Oct 17, 1997

Defense Secretary William Cohen has ordered a military-wide security review following the arrests of 13 people suspected of trafficking military explosives. Six of the suspects are marines. The arrests yesterday were part of an ongoing 18-month investigation into the theft of military weapons including rocket launchers, machine guns, mines, mortars and grenades. Much of the ordnance was stolen from Camp Lejeune, the sprawling Marine base in eastern North Carolina, where five of the marines were arrested. Four marines were stationed there; the fifth was posted at nearby Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station. Federal undercover agents bought large quantities of weapons and ammunition during Operation Long Fuse, this according to William Perry, special agent in the FBI’s Charlotte office.

Continental Airlines Ordered to Pay Female Pilot in Sexual Harassment Suit over Pornographic Pictures in Cockpits

Oct 17, 1997

A federal jury has ordered Continental Airlines to pay $875,000 to a female pilot who filed a sexual harassment lawsuit over pornographic pictures stashed by male colleagues in jet cockpits. The jury agreed with Captain Tammy Blakey’s claims that the pictures of naked women created a hostile work environment, but it found the Houston-based airline had not retaliated or sexually discriminated against her in terms of pay or assignment, and would not have to pay punitive damages. The month-long trial has exposed a tradition among male airline pilots leaving dirty pictures strewn a surprises for the next crew, slipped inside flight manuals or behind equipment panels and pasted in drawers.

Argentine Youth Vandalize Property in Protest over President Clinton’s Visit

Oct 17, 1997

In Argentina, groups of youths stoned store and bank windows, lit fires and fought with police in downtown Buenos Aires yesterday at the end of an otherwise peaceful march by left-leaning parties protesting President Clinton’s visit. About 50 youths, their faces covered with bandanas, threw rocks and Molotov cocktails at the windows of several banks and shops. Neighbors extinguished the fires with buckets of water. Police dispersed the youth with tear gas after they broke windows. No arrests were immediately reported. The march was organized by parties along the avenue in the northern section of the capital, where Argentine President Carlos Menem was scheduled to host a state dinner for Clinton. Marchers, many with Che Guevara T-shirts and carrying red flags, chanted, “Clinton, get out of Argentina!” And they burned American flags.

Landmines Along Peru-Ecuador Border Have Killed 21

Oct 17, 1997

Landmines along the border between Peru and Ecuador have killed 21 people and wounded 39 since the two countries fought a brief border war at the start of 1995. Some 100,000 mines have been planted along the disputed border, and the devices have been responsible for the deaths of 11 Peruvians, 10 Ecuadorians and others.

Iraq Threatens to Ban U.N. Weapons Inspections If New Sanctions Are Imposed on Baghdad

Oct 17, 1997

Iraq is threatening to ban U.N. weapons inspections and cease cooperation with the Security Council if additional sanctions are imposed on Baghdad. In jeopardy if Iraq were to follow through on its threat are an Oil-for-Food deal, that was agreed upon after much negotiation, and no-fly zones over northern Iraq. Both measures were approved by the council. The United States wants the council to add travel restrictions to the list of sanctions slapped on Iraq since President Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait in 1990, touching off the Persian Gulf War. When Turkish troops bombard northern Iraq to go after the Kurds, there has not been protest from the United Nations or the United States, even as they go into the no-fly zones.

Restart of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Delayed by Flaws in Pipe Seams

Oct 17, 1997

Flaws in pipe seams in the cooling system of Chernobyl’s only functioning nuclear reactor have caused a new delay in the restart of the power plant. Taken offline July 21st for maintenance that was supposed to last 70 days, Reactor Number 3 will not be turned back on until early next year. Officials announced an initial delay last month because repair workers unexpectedly found it was necessary to replace more than a hundred of the reactor’s fuel channels, a network of pipes that move fuel through the reactor. The pipes showed signs of wear and tear.

White House Fundraising Tapes Refocus Attention on Solicitation of Illegal Foreign Contributions

Oct 17, 1997

White House fundraising tapes have refocused attention on what may be the central question in campaign investigations, that of whether illegal foreign contributions were knowingly solicited. Several of the tapes offer tantalizing clues, with President Clinton thanking audiences that he knew included some foreigners.

Georgia Woman Gives Birth After Being Impregnated with Frozen Donor Eggs

Oct 17, 1997

A Georgia woman gave birth after being impregnated with frozen donor eggs in what may be the first such case in the U.S. Pregnancies from frozen embryos or fertilized eggs are no longer rare, but frozen eggs were thought too fragile to fertilize after thawing. Reproductive Biology Associates clinic in Atlanta did the procedure.

OSHA Proposes Regulations to Cut Tuberculosis Cases Among High-Risk Workers

Oct 17, 1997

OSHA proposed regulations intended to cut tuberculosis cases among high-risk workers in hospitals, prisons and homeless shelters by requiring respirators and routine testing. The agency says the rules would cost $245 million a year and estimates that they could prevent as many as 25,000 infections.

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