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Environmental Awards Given

StoryApril 16, 1997
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One of the most prestigious — and wealthiest — environmental
prizes awarded every year to grassroots activists is the Goldman
Environmental Prize. This year, the seven winners from five
continents receive a "no strings attached" award of $75,000.

This years winners include a Russian naval officer accused of
treason for exposing radioactive contamination and a Somoan tribal
chief who stopped loggers from destroying ancestral rain forests.

Today we’re pleased to be joined by two of the winners. Terri
Swearingen, an Ohio nurse who played a key role in organizing
opposition to the nation’s largest toxic waste incinerator. And
Juan Pablo Orrego of the Group to Save the Bio Bio in Chile, one of
the world’s last major free-flowing rivers.

GUESTS:

TERRI SWEARINGEN, a nurse from East Liverpool, Ohio, who
played a key role in organizing opposition to the nation’s largest
toxic waste incinerator.

JUAN PABLO ORREGO, the director of the Group to Save the Bio.
Bio, one of the world’s last major free-flowing rivers. The group
has repeatedly foiled plans to expedite construction of the mammoth
Ralco Dam in Chile, South America.


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