Modal close

Dear Democracy Now! visitor,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power. Democracy Now! brings you crucial reporting like our coverage from the front lines of the standoff at Standing Rock or news about the movements fighting for peace, racial and economic justice, immigrant rights and LGBTQ equality. We produce our daily news hour at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation—all without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How is this possible? Only with your support. Right now, a generous funder will match your donation dollar for dollar. That means when you give $10 to Democracy Now!, we'll receive $20. So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2017.

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Topics

SILENCE IN THE NEWSROOM

StoryAugust 20, 1997
Watch iconWatch Full Show

Guests
Dahr Jamail

Independent journalist who reported has extensively from Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey, and Jordan. He was unembedded in Iraq and witnessed the April 2004 siege of Fallujah. He is the author of "Beyond the Green Zone: Dispatches from an Unembedded Journalist in Occupied Iraq."


Prosecutors looking into the torture and brutalization of a Haitian immigrant in New York earlier this month say that the refusal of police witnesses to come forward and testify about the actions of their fellow officers has impeded their investigation.

But while the Blue Wall of Silence may end up suffocating the investigation into the torture of 30-year-old Abner Louima, many observers say that equally problematic has been a virtual "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" policy in the country’s news rooms when it comes to police brutality.

Guest:
• Earl Caldwell, formerly a reporter for the New York Times and a columnist for the New York Daily News. He rose to national prominence for his coverage of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. He was also the subject of a major press freedom battle resulting in a landmark ruling by the US Supreme Court on the right of journalists to protect their sources.


The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.

Make a donation