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Could the War Cost $800 Billion? a Discussion On the Cost of the Iraq Invasion and What It Means to the American Public

StoryMarch 27, 2003
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Military analysts are saying Bush administration’s $75 billion budget request to fund the war with Iraq and cover related costs is just a down payment for what will likely be a much costlier conflict

President Bush’s proposal includes $63 billion to fight the war, $8 billion in bilateral foreign aid to countries helping with the war effort and for reconstruction and humanitarian relief, and $4 billion for homeland security.

The $8 billion goes towards U.S. allies in the so-called war on terror including Jordan, Israel, Turkey, Pakistan, Egypt, Afghanistan, the Philippines and Columbia.

But will the war cost only $75 billion? Jason Nisse of The Independent (UK) suggests the total cost could rise to $800 billion.

We are going to talk about what the war will really cost and what is not include.

  • Jason Nisse, business correspondent for The Independent newspaper, London. He wrote an article earlier this month called "The $800 Billion Conflict and A World Left Licking Its Wounds" which looks at how expensive the war will really be.
  • Greg Speeter, Executive Director, National Priorities Project, a non-profit which analyzes how federal policies affect ordinary Americans in cities and towns around the country. They recently published a report examining the cost to states and cities of the invasion of Iraq.

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