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Congress Passes Sweeping Bill to Roll Back Dodd-Frank Act Regulations

HeadlineMay 23, 2018

On Capitol Hill, Congress passed sweeping legislation to exempt thousands of banks from key regulations in the 2010 Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, meaning the vast majority of banks will no longer have to follow the regulations aimed at preventing another financial meltdown. The Dodd-Frank Act was passed after the 2008 economic crisis, which was provoked by years of risky lending by Wall Street banks.

Yet, in a rare bipartisan effort Tuesday, House lawmakers voted 258 to 159 to exempt banks with less than $250 billion in assets from many of these regulations, even though banks’ profits are soaring. A report issued Tuesday from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation said the net income of banks and saving institutions hit $56 billion in the first quarter of this year—a 27 percent increase from a year ago. Thirty-three Democrats joined their Republican counterparts in voting for the financial regulation rollback, which, if signed into law, would leave fewer than 10 banks in the U.S. subject to stricter federal oversight. We’ll have more on the regulation rollback later in the broadcast.

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