Seesaw Installation on U.S.-Mexico Border Highlights Human Toll of Immigration Policies

HeadlineJul 31, 2019

And in New Mexico, children on the U.S. and Mexican sides of the border wall were able to play together after two California professors installed a cross-border seesaw that fits through the steel slats separating the two countries. The idea for the “Teeter-Totter Wall” came from architecture professor Ronald Rael and design professor Virginia San Fratello, who originally conceived of the project in 2009. “The wall became a literal fulcrum for U.S.-Mexico relations,” said Ronald Rael. “Actions that take place on one side have a direct consequence on the other side.”

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