Modal close

Dear Democracy Now! visitor,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power. Democracy Now! brings you crucial reporting like our coverage from the front lines of the standoff at Standing Rock or news about the movements fighting for peace, racial and economic justice, immigrant rights and LGBTQ equality. We produce our daily news hour at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation—all without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How is this possible? Only with your support. If every visitor to this site in December gave just $10 we could cover our basic operating costs for 2017. Pretty exciting, right? So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2017.

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Topics

The Puerto Rican Civil Rights Movement

StoryOctober 18, 1996
Watch iconWatch Full Show

Guests
Juan González

former minister of education of the Young Lords.

Iris Morales

attorney and director of education at the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund and maker of the new film Palante, Siempre Palante! The Young Lords.

juan ramos

founder of Philadelphia Young Lords and currently the vice chair of that city’s police advisory commission. Recipient of the Cesar Chavez Community Service Award from the U.S. Hispanic Leadership Conference.

Minerva Solla

former Young Lord and current union organizer for 1199SEIU.

Tonight, and on the coming weeks in many public television stations, a new documentary will debut that looks back at the Puerto Rican civil rights movement led by the young Lords in the 1960 and 70s. The Young Lords were a militant Latino group that rose up in the barrios of Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia and other major cities. Like the Black Panthers, the Lords galvanized a generation of activists to provide much needed services to communities long ignored by politicians.


The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.

Make a donation