Modal close

Dear Democracy Now! visitor,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power. Democracy Now! brings you crucial reporting like our coverage from the front lines of the standoff at Standing Rock or news about the movements fighting for peace, racial and economic justice, immigrant rights and LGBTQ equality. We produce our daily news hour at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation—all without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How is this possible? Only with your support. If every visitor to this site in December gave just $10 we could cover our basic operating costs for 2017. Pretty exciting, right? So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2017.

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Topics

Booker Prize-Winning Author Arundhati Roy Slams U.S. Invasion As Protests Intensify and U.N. Security Council Members Voice Their Opposition

StoryMarch 20, 2003
Watch iconWatch Full Show

Around the world, international leaders are condemning the U.S. war. Top officials from France, Russia, China, India, Pakistan, Greece, Malyasia, Indonesia and New Zealand are among the countries opposing the attack.

China called for an immediate halt to the attack. Indonesia requested an emergency meeting of the Security Council to stop the war. And New Zealand said it "won’t assist in a baseless war."

Hours before the bombs fell, chief UN weapons inspector Hans Blix said it was regrettable that war would soon begin. He reported to the Security Council that Iraqi disarmament of weapons could have been verified in a matter of months.

Then individual countries had the chance to respond. German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer opened the debate, saying his country "emphatically rejects the impending war." He said, "Why should we now–especially now–abandon our plan to disarm Iraq with peaceful means?"

  • Arundhati Roy, acclaimed Indian author speaking to us from New Delhi. She is author of several books, including ??The God of Small Things, ??Power Politics, and most recently, ??War Talk.
  • Retired Iraqi official, speaking from his home in Baghdad.
  • United Nations Security Council members on US plans to attack Iraq, March 19, 2003: Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin of France, Farouk Al-Shara’, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Syria, Ambassador Adolfo Aguilar Zinser of Mexico, Ambassador Gabriel Valdés of Chile, Permanent Representative Wang Yingfan of China, Foreign Minister François Lonseny Fall of Guinea, Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov of Russia.
  • John Gilbert, union member in Italy who went on strike today.

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.

Make a donation