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U.S. Delegation Goes to Middle East With $600,000 in Aid For Fallujah Refugees

StoryDecember 28, 2004
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A delegation of military family members whose sons died while fighting in the Iraq war have traveled to Jordan to deliver $600,000 worth of humanitarian supplies for refugees from the U.S. attack on Falluja. [includes rush transcript]

The November attack, which virtually leveled the city and left some 2,000 Iraqis and 71 U.S. soldiers dead, also created thousands of refugees, who are living without adequate food, water, electricity and healthcare. Most of these refugees are children.

In an Internet appeal, the military family members, in collaboration with U.S. peace groups, physicians’ organizations, and September 11 families, quickly raised $100,000 in donations. And humanitarian groups such as the Middle East Children”s Alliance and Operation USA contributed $500,000 worth of medical supplies.

We go now to Jordan to hear from Medea Benjamin, founder of Code Pink and Adele Welty, the mother of a firefighter who died on Sept. 11.

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Transcript
This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re going to turn now to Jordan, to hear from three members of the delegation that just made it there, Medea Benjamin, founder of Code Pink, Adele Welty the mother of a firefighter who died on September 11 and joyed us just — joined us just before she left last week, as well as Fernando Suarez del Solar, the father of a soldier killed in Iraq. We begin with Medea Benjamin.

MEDEA BENJAMIN: We’re here to bring humanitarian supplies to the refugees from Fallujah. We were very upset when we saw the U.S. military destroy the entire city of Fallujah. We know that there are thousands of women and children who are living without electricity, water, medicines, so we’re here to bring supplies to them to show that there are American people who care about their lives, and to say that it’s time to stop the killing, and help the Iraqi people.

ADELE WELTY: I lost my son on September 11 at the World Trade Center. He was a firefighter, and he — he went to the World Trade Center to help rescue those who were — who were caught in the — in the towers. And he was trapped when it — when they collapsed. And I don’t want his name used to kill innocent civilians.

AMY GOODMAN: Adele Welty, Medea Benjamin, they are with Fernando Suarez del Solar, who lost his son in Iraq and they have made it to the Iraqi border, again, delivering — hoping to get supplies to the people of Fallujah.

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