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South Asia: Heat Waves Could Make 1.5 Billion People’s Homes Uninhabitable by 2100

HeadlineAug 07, 2017
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In major climate news, soaring temperatures could make parts of South Asia too hot for human survival by 2100. That’s according to new research by scientists at MIT, who say as many as 1.5 billion people live in areas that could become uninhabitable during summer heat waves within only 83 years if climate change continues at its current pace.

Meanwhile, a new separate study, published by The Lancet, says heat waves could kill up to 152,000 people a year across Europe by 2100. Europe is currently experiencing a sweltering, record-breaking heat wave called “Lucifer.”

Back in the United States, in Louisiana, torrential downpours flooded parts of New Orleans over the weekend, submerging cars, inundating homes and schools, and forcing people to wade through hip-deep water in some neighborhoods. The flash floods overwhelmed the city’s sewerage system. The head of the Sewerage and Water Board, Cedric Grant, says the flooding was part of climate change.

Cedric Grant: “The frustration is that we are now in a different era. We are in the era of climate change, where we have these kind of rains every week—or, every month. And it’s not just us. It’s the rest of the country that’s experiencing the same weather patterns. We are in a situation where we now receive more rain than anybody could have imagined, on a recurring basis.”

On Friday, the Trump administration delivered an official notice to the United Nations saying it would withdraw the U.S. from the landmark 2015 Paris climate accord.

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