Modal close

Hi there,

This month Democracy Now! is celebrating our 24th birthday. That's 24 years of hard-hitting news that you know has never been funded by commercial advertisers, corporate underwriters or the government. This is how we protect the editorial independence you rely on. It also means we're counting on you. In honor of our 24th birthday, a generous supporter will DOUBLE every donation to Democracy Now!, meaning your gift can go twice as far. Please do your part. It takes just minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else for another 24 years. Thank you so much!
-Amy Goodman

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Donate

Federal Court Rules Victims of 2015 Charleston Mass Shooting Can Sue U.S. Gov’t

HeadlineSep 03, 2019

In more news about gun violence, a federal court ruled that survivors and the relatives of victims of 2015’s massacre at Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, can sue the government for its failure in the firearms background check system. Nine black worshipers were killed in the mass shooting. Dylann Roof purchased a semiautomatic pistol from a licensed gun seller, but the agent who was charged with verifying his background failed to obtain a police report of a past drug-related infraction, which would have barred him from legally acquiring the weapon. Following the shooting, then-FBI Director James Comey admitted he should not have been permitted to purchase the gun. Roof was found guilty on 33 counts of federal hate crimes and sentenced to death in 2017.

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.
Make a donation
Up arrowTop