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Topics

Super Tuesday in Mississippi and Tennessee

StoryMarch 11, 1996
Watch iconWatch Full Show

Guests
Mary Coleman

Professor of political science at Jackson State University

Jim Sessions

Executive director of the Highlander Center

On the eve of Super Tuesday, Mary Coleman discusses issues of political interest in Mississippi in light of her recent work in emerging democracies in Africa and Eastern Europe. She focuses on problems of poverty, unemployment, and racism. She highlights the twin pillars of democracy and poverty in the
U.S., and contends that government and corporations must be held accountable.  
Jim Sessions discusses political issues in Tennessee, including the traditional use of social issues such as the debate over evolution in schools to distract from real issues, such as job insecurity. Both report that Republican candidates have largely avoided both states.

Segment Subjects (keywords for the segment): Mississippi, Tennessee, Republican primary, 1996 presidential election


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