Modal close

Dear Democracy Now! visitor,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power. Democracy Now! brings you crucial reporting like our coverage from the front lines of the standoff at Standing Rock or news about the movements fighting for peace, racial and economic justice, immigrant rights and LGBTQ equality. We produce our daily news hour at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation—all without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How is this possible? Only with your support. Right now, a generous funder will match your donation dollar for dollar. That means when you give $10 to Democracy Now!, we'll receive $20. So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2017.

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Topics

Trade Union Activism

StoryApril 14, 1997
Watch iconWatch Full Show

Tens of thousands of strawberry workers, their families and
supporters, including AFL-CIO leader John Sweeney, staged a
massive rally yesterday in Watsonville, California.

The issue — fairness for the 20,000 strawberry pickers in
California, who produce about 80 percent of the country’s
crop. The pickers say they work at very low pay with little
protection against dangerous pesticides. Many of the women
workers say that sexual harassment is common.

Led by the United Farmworkers Union, the strawberry workers
are now demanding "5 cents for fairness." They say that the
handful of industry corporations that bring in $650 million
a year can afford to pay pickers 5 cents more per pint of
strawberries.

It was no accident that AFL-CIO President John Sweeney was
in Watsonville yesterday. The strawberry worker’s campaign
is just one example of a new drive by the AFL-CIO leadership
to revitalize the trade union movement.

GUEST:

ELAINE BERNARD, a labor activist, educator and a
founding member of the both the New Party and Labor Party.
Presently, she is the executive director of the trade union
program at Harvard University, the oldest labor leadership
program in the United States.


The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.

Make a donation