Modal close

Hi there,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. This weekend, we're broadcasting live from D.C. as students and people of all ages converge on the capital to demand action on gun control. Our coverage is produced at a fraction of the cost of a commercial news operation, without ads, paywalls, government funds or corporate sponsors. How is this possible? Only with your support. If you and everyone visiting this website gave just $4, it would cover our operating costs for 2018. Pretty exciting, right? Please do your part. It takes just a few minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else.

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.



Default content image
Media Options

Last week, Democracy Now! took a look at the controversial Church of Scientology, whose activities have been hitting the headlines both at home and abroad. Today we have both sides of the debate on the Church of Scientology.

Last month, more than a thousand Scientologists in Frankfurt, Germany, chanted slogans and songs borrowed from the US civil rights movement, alleging that they are victims of religious persecution. A number of German states and organizations have banned Scientologists from participation in political parties, and the German government voted to allow the country’s intelligence agency to keep tabs on members in Germany.

The French parliament recently designated Scientology a sect, included on a list of 173 groups that should be tracked to prevent cult activities.

In Los Angeles, at least three public school teachers are using Scientology teachings in their classrooms and one of them is hoping to establish a separate, tax-funded charter school using the same methods.

• Bill Moon, a long time Scientologist. He is a financial services professional based in Southern California.
• Jim Siegelman, the co-author of Snapping: America’s Epidemic of Sudden Personality Change. He has been studying Scientology for more than 20 years along with other spiritual and personal growing practices in the United States. Snapping, originally published in 1978, has recently been updated and re-released.

Related Story

Video squareStoryMar 15, 2018Remembering Courtlin Arrington: The Victim of a Recent School Shooting Largely Ignored by Media
The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.
Make a donation
Up arrowTop