Modal close

Dear Democracy Now! visitor,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power. Democracy Now! brings you crucial reporting like our coverage from the front lines of the standoff at Standing Rock or news about the movements fighting for peace, racial and economic justice, immigrant rights and LGBTQ equality. We produce our daily news hour at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation—all without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How is this possible? Only with your support. If every visitor to this site in December gave just $10 we could cover our basic operating costs for 2017. Pretty exciting, right? So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2017.

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Topics

Elections in Peru, the First Round

StoryApril 09, 2001
Watch iconWatch Full Show
Topics

The first round of presidential elections in Peru has ended with the pre-poll favorite, Alejandro Toledo, on courseto win the most votes, but falling short of securing an outright victory.

Initial results suggest that Toledo polled about 36% of the vote — less than the 50% needed to avoid a second roundof voting.

He now looks set to face former President Alan Garcia _ who mounted a far stronger challenge than most observerspredicted _ in a decisive run-off poll.

Lourdes Flores could now become instrumental in deciding who will become the next president. If she chooses toendorse Toledo, his victory is virtually assured. But if she directs her supporters to back Garcia, the final outcomewill be wide open.

Pollsters warn that initial figures should be treated with caution, since exit polls proved wrong in presidentialelections a year ago. But if the results are confirmed, a second contest will take place in May or June.

Guest:

  • Javier Diaz Conseco, a longtime member of the Peruvian congress, and representative of progressive leftwho ran for a seat in Congress in Sunday’s election.

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.

Make a donation