Modal close

Dear Democracy Now! visitor,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power. Democracy Now! brings you crucial reporting like our coverage from the front lines of the standoff at Standing Rock or news about the movements fighting for peace, racial and economic justice, immigrant rights and LGBTQ equality. We produce our daily news hour at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation—all without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How is this possible? Only with your support. If every visitor to this site in December gave just $10 we could cover our basic operating costs for 2017. Pretty exciting, right? So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2017.

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Topics

DELEGATES AT UN CONFERENCE SAY SLAVERY AND REPARATIONS, NOT ISRAEL, REASON FOR US WALKOUT

StorySeptember 05, 2001
Watch iconWatch Full Show
Topics

Guests
Malik Shabazz

Megan Williams’s lawyer. He’s also the co-founder of Black Lawyers for Justice and the leader of the New Black Panther Party. He helped organize the hate crime awareness march in Charleston November 3rd. Malik Shabazz joins us from Washington, DC.

Luz Marquez

Associate Director of the National Organization of Sisters of Color Ending Sexual Assault, also known as SCESA. She was at the march in Charleston and met with Megan Williams. She also helped organize a national campaign to draw attention to both Megan Williams as well as other cases of assaults against women of color. The campaign is called Document the Silence. Luz Marquez joins us on the phone from Troy, New York.

Herb Boyd

Activist, teacher, author, and journalist. He edits the online publication The Black World Today and writes for several publications including Amsterdam News.

Senior diplomats at the U.N. Conference Against Racism are charging that the U.S. withdrawal from the conference was prompted by its fear of facing massive reparations claims over the enslavement of African Americans, and not, as it implied, by friction over the Middle East. As Israeli and the U.S. delegations packed their bags for early flights home today, a South African Government spokesman said: "The general perception among all delegates is that the US does not want to confront the real issues of slavery and all its manifestations." The headline of an article yesterday in the Durban-based Daily news read pay-out key to US walk-out. Civil Rights activist Jesse Jackson also slammed the U.S. delegation for pulling out of the conference, saying it was a political smokescreen to evade the slavery issue. He says he will make reparations a priority when he returns to the U.S.

GUEST:

- ADJUA AYATORA, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), and legal counsel for the National Council of Blacks for Reparations in America (NCOBRA). Adjua is also working with the coordinating committee for the African and African Descendents Caucus at the UN conference. She lives in Washington, D.C. CONTACT: www.ncobra.com

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.

Make a donation