Modal close

Hi there,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free daily news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines, or our in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power. You need news that isn't being paid for by campaigns or corporations. We produce our daily news hour at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation—all without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How? This model of news depends on your support. Right now, every new monthly sustaining donation to Democracy Now! will be tripled by a generous supporter. That means if you can give just $4 a month, Democracy Now! gets $12 today.  Pretty amazing right? If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, start your monthly contribution today. Thanks so much. -Amy Goodman

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Donate

The “Hollywood Hacking Bill”: A Proposal in Congress Gives Corporations the Right to Hack Into Personal Computer Networks to Protect Copyrighted Material

Listen
Media Options
Listen

Corporations may soon be given the right to hack into personal computer networks to protect copyrighted material. The major record and film companies hope to use this legislation to end online piracy. But critics fear the House bill would severely compromise personal privacy. The bill expands police powers to eavesdrop over the Internet or telephone without a court order.

But not all hacking is equal before the eyes of the government. In early July, the House voted to increase the maximum sentence for other forms of hacking to life in prison.

Guests:

  • Declan McCullagh, chief political correspondent for CNET’s News.com. For the last four years, he has been the Washington bureau chief for Wired News. He was the first online reporter to join the National Press Club and he participated in the first White House dot com press pool. McCullagh writes and speaks frequently about technology, law, and politics.
  • Siva Vaidhyanathan, media studies scholar and cultural historian. He is the author of “Copyrights and Copywrongs: The Rise of Intellectual Property and How it Threatens Creativity.”
  • Alec French, counsel to Congressman Howard Berman (D-CA), the ranking member on the House Judiciary Subcommittee. Representative Berman proposed the “Peer to Peer Piracy Prevention Act” in Congress.

Related links:

Related Story

Video squareStorySep 18, 2018Intercept Report Reveals Senate Ignored Federal Court Employees Willing to Testify Against Kavanaugh
The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.
Make a donation
Up arrowTop