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Projectionists Light Up New York City Buildings, and Protesters’ Spirits, with Occupy-Themed Display

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As tens of thousands marched in a seemingly endless sea of people last night in downtown New York City, large words in light appeared projected onto several downtown buildings. We spoke with two of the projectionists who made it happen as they stood in the streets. “Sometimes you’ve just got to claim the spaces available,” says Taylor K. “We can put our message, communicate with our people, right on a canvas that we’ve been given, which happens to be City Hall.” [includes rush transcript]

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This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: During the march on the Brooklyn Bridge, as tens of thousands streamed in an endless sea of people, words in light appeared projected onto several downtown buildings.

TAYLOR K.: My name is Taylor K. This is Roseanna S. And we are projecting onto City Hall with mobile video projection units. Right now we’re projecting “99%” and “Occupy Together” right across the front of the building.

RENÉE FELTZ: How does this fit into the idea of occupying public space and putting your message out?

TAYLOR K.: Fits perfectly in. Sometimes you’ve just got to claim the spaces available. Seeing that these are ephemeral lights that we’re just shining onto the building, nobody can really claim it as ownership. And it’s not really graffiti, because it will move. But it still has the same impact, to the fact that we can put our message, communicate with our people, right on a canvas that we’ve been given, which happens to be City Hall.

AMY GOODMAN: Among the buildings where the projections were sent was the iconic Verizon building nearby. This is a Democracy Now! special, “Voices of the 99 Percent,” as we continue with a world premier of Ry Cooder’s song.

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The Revolution Will Be Live-Streamed: Global Revolution TV, the Occupy Movement’s Video Hub

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