Modal close

Dear Democracy Now! visitor,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power. Democracy Now! brings you crucial reporting like our coverage from the front lines of the standoff at Standing Rock or news about the movements fighting for peace, racial and economic justice, immigrant rights and LGBTQ equality. We produce our daily news hour at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation—all without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How is this possible? Only with your support. If every visitor to this site in December gave just $10 we could cover our basic operating costs for 2017. Pretty exciting, right? So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2017.

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Topics

Bernie Sanders on NH Victory: "Tonight We Served Notice to the Political and Economic Establishment"

StoryFebruary 10, 2016
Watch iconWatch Full Show

In the Democratic New Hampshire primary, Senator Bernie Sanders beat former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton by a margin of 60 to 38 percent. Eight years ago, Clinton won New Hampshire, defeating Senator Barack Obama. When polling first began in New Hampshire over a year ago, Clinton was projected to win by as much as 50 percent, but Sanders has steadily chipped away at her support. On Tuesday, Sanders beat Clinton in nearly every demographic area except for senior citizens and families earning over $200,000. According to exit polls, 55 percent of women—including 70 percent of women under 30—backed the Vermont senator. Overall, Sanders won 83 percent of the under-30 vote. By winning New Hampshire, Sanders becomes the first Jewish candidate to ever win a major presidential primary.


TRANSCRIPT
This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: Senator Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump soared to commanding victories in the New Hampshire primaries Tuesday. Trump won 35 percent of the vote in the Republican race. Ohio Governor John Kasich placed a surprising second with 15 percent, followed by Ted Cruz, Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio and Chris Christie. In the Democratic race, Sanders beat former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton by a margin of 60 to 38 percent. Eight years ago, Clinton won New Hampshire, defeating Senator Barack Obama. When polling first began in New Hampshire, Clinton was projected to win by as much as 50 percent, but Sanders has steadily chipped away at her support.

On Tuesday, Sanders beat Clinton in nearly every demographic except for senior citizens and families earning over $200,000 a year. According to exit polls, 55 percent of women, including 70 percent of women under 30, backed the Vermont senator. Overall, Sanders won 83 percent of the under-29 vote. By winning New Hampshire, Sanders becomes the first Jewish candidate to ever win a major presidential primary. He gave his victory speech in Concord, New Hampshire.

SEN. BERNIE SANDERS: What began last week in Iowa, what voters here in New Hampshire confirmed tonight, is nothing short of the beginning of a political revolution. It is—it is a political revolution that will bring tens of millions of our people together. It will bring together working people who have given up on the political process. It will bring together young people who have never participated in the political process. It will bring together blacks and whites, Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans, straight and gay, male and female, people who were born in America and people who immigrated here. We will all come together to say loudly and clearly that the government of our great nation belongs to all of us, not just a few wealthy campaign contributors. That is what this campaign is about. That is what the political revolution is about. So, New Hampshire, thank you again. And now it’s on—thank you, New Hampshire. And now it’s on to Nevada, South Carolina and beyond.

AMY GOODMAN: Vermont Senator Sanders, speaking at Concord High School in New Hampshire. Speaking in Hooksett, New Hampshire, Hillary Clinton congratulated Senator Sanders before describing herself as, quote, "the best changemaker." Looking ahead to the upcoming races in South Carolina and Nevada, Clinton said Sanders’ call for cracking down on Wall Street is not enough.

HILLARY CLINTON: We also have to break through the barriers of bigotry. African-American parents shouldn’t have to worry that their children will be harassed, humiliated, even shot because of the color of their skin. Immigrant families shouldn’t have to lie awake at night listening for a knock on the door. LGBT Americans shouldn’t be fired from their jobs because of who they are or who they love. And let’s finally deliver something long overdue: equal pay for women in this economy. ... When people anywhere in America are held back by injustice, that demands action. That is why I believe so strongly that we have to keep up, with every fiber of our being, the argument for the campaign for human rights, human rights as women’s rights, human rights as gay rights, human rights as worker rights, human rights as voting rights—human rights across the board for every single American!

AMY GOODMAN: Hillary Clinton, speaking from New Hampshire after her major defeat by Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders. When we come back from break, we go to Manchester, New Hampshire, where we’ll be joined by a former gubernatorial candidate, the longtime radio and TV talk show host Arnie Arnesen. Stay with us.

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Next story from this daily show

"An Earthshaking Moment": Sanders Win Reveals Deep Divide Between Voters & Democratic Party Leaders

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.

Make a donation