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Topics

Murder of Women in Domestic Violence

StoryApril 02, 1997
Watch iconWatch Full Show

Guests
Marine Sergeant Adam Kokesh

member of Iraq Veterans Against the War.

Private First Class Evan Knappenberger

on Thursday, he wrapped up an eight-day, 24-hour vigil in Bellingham, Washington to protest the military’s stop/loss policy. Stop loss allows the military to extend soldiers” tour of duty and send them back to Iraq.

A groundbreaking new study examining the murder of women
was released this week, and in it are some startling new
conclusions that are challenging old assumptions about
violence against women.

The New York City Department of Health studied the murder
of more than 1,100 women in the city over a five year period.
The portrait that emerges details how women were murdered,
who they were, and where they died.

GUEST:

DR. SUSAN WILT, an epidemiologist at the New York
City Department of Health and the leader of the study on
murder and women.


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