Modal close

Dear Democracy Now! visitor,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. Maybe you come for our daily headlines. Maybe you come for in-depth stories that expose corporate and government abuses of power. Democracy Now! brings you crucial reporting like our coverage from the front lines of the standoff at Standing Rock or news about the movements fighting for peace, racial and economic justice, immigrant rights and LGBTQ equality. We produce our daily news hour at a fraction of the budget of a commercial news operation—all without ads, government funding or corporate sponsorship. How is this possible? Only with your support. If every visitor to this site in December gave just $10 we could cover our basic operating costs for 2017. Pretty exciting, right? So, if you've been waiting to make your contribution to Democracy Now!, today is your day. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else in 2017.

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Topics

U.S. Occupies An Arab Capital for the First Time in History As Hussein's Regime Falls: British Reporter Andrew Buncombe Joins US From Baghdad

StoryApril 10, 2003
Watch iconWatch Full Show
Topics

US troops, tanks, and armored vehicles rolled in and occupied the capitol with only scattered resistance. Thousands of residents poured into the streets. They celebrated, greeted US troops with cheers and even flowers, looted, and tore down symbols of Saddam’s rule. It is the first time in history that the United States has occupied an Arab capital.

In the most dramatic moment, a moment that was broadcast around the world, a group of Iraqis gathered around the gigantic statue of Saddam Hussein in Al-Fardus Square. They tried to cut down the statue with a sledgehammer but had little luck. Then US marines roped the statue to an armored personnel carrier. One US marine climbed to the top and covered Hussein’s head with an American flag. The American flag was quickly removed and an old Iraqi flag hung around Saddam’s neck.

Then, the Marines toppled the statue.

One resident told journalist Robert Fisk: "You’ll see the celebrations and we will be happy Saddam has gone. But we will then want to rid ourselves of the Americans and we will want to keep our oil and there will be resistance and then they will call us "terrorists."

  • Andrew Buncombe, reporter with the Independent of London. He is reporting now in Iraq.

The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.

Make a donation