Modal close

Hi there,

You turn to Democracy Now! for ad-free news you can trust. This week Democracy Now! went to the U.S.-Mexico border, where we talked to people on the front lines of the immigration crisis. If on the ground coverage like this is important to you, please donate today. Right now every donation we receive will be tripled by a generous supporter. This means if you give $8 today, Democracy Now! will get $24 to support coverage like this year-round. Please do your part. It takes just a couple of minutes to make sure that Democracy Now! is there for you and everybody else. Thank you so much!
-Amy Goodman

Non-commercial news needs your support.

We rely on contributions from you, our viewers and listeners to do our work. If you visit us daily or weekly or even just once a month, now is a great time to make your monthly contribution.

Please do your part today.

Donate

Doctor Who Treated Thousands of GIs Wounded in Iraq: “Severest Form of Injuries I’ve Seen in My Career”

Listen
Media Options
Listen

Related

We speak with Dr. Gene Bolles who for the last two years served as the chief of neurosurgery at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center–the largest hospital outside the U.S. for troops stationed in Europe and the Middle East–about what is not frequently discussed in the mainstream media: wounded soldiers.

In the latest news from Iraq, six Iraqis and a US soldier were killed in a massive car bomb outside the headquarters of the US occupation authority in Baghdad.

Following the bloodiest month for US troops since the beginning of the invasion, the total number of American soldiers killed in Iraq has now topped 760. U.S. authorities have not bothered to count the Iraqi dead, but some estimates put the number as high as 11,000.

News reports and Pentagon briefings emerge daily announcing the death of U.S. soldiers in Iraq. But what is rarely heard in the U.S. media or from the Defense Department is the number of U.S. soldiers wounded.

Some figures that have been briefly mentioned in the press fall in the range of two to three thousand. But in a story that received little national attention, the Pentagon reported last month that the military made over 18,000 medical evacuations–representing 11,700 casualties in the first year of war in Iraq.

Nearly all those wounded US soldiers ended up in a US military hospital in Landstuhl, Germany for treatment. Today we speak with a doctor who has treated many of those casualties, Dr. Gene Bolles.

  • Dr. Gene Bolles, neurosugeon from Boulder, Colorado. He was hired as a private contractor after the 9/11 attacks to serve as the chief of neurosurgery at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, the largest hospital outside the U.S. for troops stationed in Europe and the Middle East. He returned from Landstuhl after more than two years treating wounded US soldiers. Bolles was the surgeon who repaired the broken back of Army Pfc. Jessica Lynch after her rescue as a prisoner of war in Iraq last April.
  • Mark Benjamin, UPI Investigations editor. He has been closely following the hidden US casualties from the Iraq war. He was awarded the American Legion’s top journalism award for 2004 for his reporting last fall on the plight of hundreds of sick, wounded and injured soldiers at Fort Stewart, Ga.

Related Story

Video squareWeb ExclusiveJul 19, 201915 Years Later: How U.K. Whistleblower Katharine Gun Risked Everything to Leak a Damning Iraq War Memo
The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.org. Some of the work(s) that this program incorporates, however, may be separately licensed. For further information or additional permissions, contact us.

Non-commercial news needs your support

We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work.
Please do your part today.
Make a donation
Up arrowTop